Transitions: Henrico County, VA; DeSoto County, MS; Cupertino, CA and more

Henrico County, Virginia (population 306,935): Henrico County Manager Virgil Hazelett, who has helped guide the county with a firm and steady hand since 1992, announced at the July 24 Board of Supervisors meeting that he will retire in January, according to The Henrico Citizen, Hazelett has spent 40 years in the county’s administration, beginning in 1972, when he was named Henrico’s first traffic engineer. He is credited with strengthening the county’s reputation as one of the most a fiscally sound localities in the nation and has helped Henrico weather difficult economic times without any layoffs or real estate tax increases. Hazelett’s retirement will complete a turnover of the six top appointed officials in the county’s administration during a five-year period. Deputy county managers George Drumwright and Angela Harper announced earlier this year that they would retire, joining three other longtime deputy managers – Harvey Hinson, Leon Johnson and Bob Pinkerton – who had retired since 2008. Hazelett is Henrico’s seventh county manager since the county instituted the form of government in 1934; all seven have been civil engineers. Deputy County Manager for Administration John Vithoulkas, the county’s former director of finance, is viewed as one possible candidate to replace Hazelett.

DeSoto County, Mississippi (population 107,199): DeSotoCounty administrator Michael Garriga has announced he is resigning to take a governmental affairs post in the private sector, according to The Commercial Appeal. Garriga said he plans to remain in his position until Aug. 16. Garriga did not specify what his next career move will be but alluded to a governmental affairs role in private industry. He said he would assist the supervisors in developing an interim leadership strategy to ensure a smooth transition for the county’s management as well as continue working toward the preparation of the county’s 2013 fiscal year budget, estimated in the $110 million range, before his departure. The Mississippi State University graduate joined DeSoto County government in 2001 as deputy director of planning and was appointed in 2004 as county administrator, DeSoto government’s top nonelected post. The Clinton native received a bachelor’s degree from MSU in 1996, followed by a master’s in public policy and administration in 1998. Russell said he “really wasn’t surprised” when Garriga called on him to advise of his departure. Garriga’s tenure at the top has coincided with huge county population growth and rising demand for services, and then an economic recession and revenue strains that have posed challenges to keeping services flowing. More than 600 full- and part-time workers are employed by the county. Services in the nonelected departments range from code enforcement to zoning to operating an animal shelter and a rubbish pit. As to Garriga’s replacement, an interim administrator is expected to be named by the supervisors to serve after Garriga leaves while the five-member panel mounts a nationwide search for a permanent chief. The post’s salary is in the $100,000 range. Supervisor Bill Russell says an interim administrator is expected to be named by the supervisors to serve after Garriga leaves while the board searches for a permanent replacement.

Cupertino, California (population 58,032): The city of Cupertino has announced the selection of David Brandt as the new city manager, according to the San Jose Mercury News. Brandt, who succeeds former city manager David Knapp, previously served as city manager in Redmond, Ore., since 2009. He has also worked in Alameda. Brandt is scheduled to begin his duties in Cupertino on Sept. 10. In the meantime, former Sunnyvale City Manager Amy Chan, serving as interim city manager since April, will continue to occupy the position.

Brandt was hired by the city of Redmond in July 2009, according to The Source Weekly. The former city manager of Redmond had been Mike Patterson, who resigned in December of 2008 after being arrested for assaulting his wife. He later pled guilty to an assault charge. In January, Mike Patterson became the city manager of Florence, Colo., a town of about 3,600, according to that city’s website. Brandt’s last day will be August 30.

Grand Island, Nebraska (population 48,520): Grand Island City Councilman John Gericke wants the resignation of former City Administrator Mary Lou Brown brought before the city council, according to The Grand Island Independent. He wants the council to vote to ratify Brown’s Sept. 30 resignation — effective immediately. Gericke raised the concern this week after he and his fellow council members were called Monday afternoon into Mayor Jay Vavricek’s office, individually and in small groups, to discuss possibly bringing Brown back to council meetings. The mayor posed the idea. Gericke said he thought the question “was strange.” He and another council member in his meeting were adamantly against the idea. Council President Peg Gilbert was also against bringing Brown back to meetings. Vavricek announced Brown’s resignation at the start of the June 26 city council meeting. He gave no reason. It came as a surprise to the public, city staff and most of the council members. But Gericke believes the mayor lacks the legal authority to take such unilateral action.He said state statute requires both the mayor and the council to end the employment agreement of a “constitutional officer.” The city’s constitutional officers are the city administrator, city engineer, city treasurer, city clerk and city attorney. Brown’s five-page employment agreement carries the same language in Section 3A(2), called “Termination for Reasons other than Just Cause and Consideration Given for the Release of all Claims Against the City.” It states: “In the event the mayor, with the approval of the city council, during the term of this agreement, terminates employee for reasons other than just cause, the city agrees to pay the employee in a single lump-sum payment an equal amount to three months of the employee’s salary.” The payout does not include other benefits such as retirement and insurance. Termination for just cause also requires action by “the mayor, with the approval of the city council,” the contract states. However, in the event of her voluntary resignation, the contract calls for Brown to give “60 days written notice in advance,” and no special lump sum payout is required. The voluntary resignation clause makes no reference to being accepted by either the mayor or the council. Gilbert said the matter is really one for the city’s legal department to resolve. The city hired Brown as finance director in July 2009. She was named interim city administrator in December 2010 and promoted to city administrator in April 2011. Her current annual salary is $116,849, making a severance buy-out total of about $29,000. Her term was to run concurrently with Mayor Vavricek’s term, which ends December 2014. Vavricek said the city would issue a statement about the interim city administrator position at 2 p.m. Thursday. He intends to request it be added to the next city council agenda. Gericke said it’s his understanding that the Sept. 30 deadline was proposed by Brown herself. The Independent requested a copy of the letter Wednesday, but also was not provided a copy. Gericke favors paying Brown a severance amount and moving on. Gilbert, though, sees Brown’s involvement in the budget as useful to the city and a good use of resources. Finance Director Jaye Monter is preparing her first city budget, Gilbert said, and might find it helpful to have input from Brown. Gericke said it’s an arrangement that doesn’t feel right. Gericke said Brown’s contract with the city also needs to end so the city can hire an interim city administrator. Ratifying her resignation “effective immediately” may help open the city administrator position so that an interim could be named, he said. Gericke said the city has set policy on the number of staff it will have and what that staff is paid. Having two people in the same position is problematic. Vavricek announced July 10 his intention to hire Grand Island Area Economic Development Corp. President Marlan Ferguson, a former Grand Island city administrator, as the interim city administrator. The mayor said that ratification would occur July 24, with Ferguson starting Aug. 6. However, the interim city administrator issue wasn’t even on the July 24 agenda. Vavricek explained he “needed more time,” but he didn’t specify why or how much time he needed. Gericke said the actions are just more “off-the-wall stuff” the mayor has come up with lately that makes it hard for the council or the public to follow. Gilbert said simply there appears to be details to work out, but she doesn’t want Brown back with face time at City Hall. Seeing Brown “involved in the city in any public way … would diminish that hope or spirit that we’re moving on in a positive direction,” Gilbert said.

Puyallup, Washington (population 37,022): The City of Puyallup will be looking for a new chief executive after City Manager Ralph Dannenberg confirmed last week that he’s leaving his job, according to The Puyallup Herald. Dannenberg said Thursday the city council “feels a change is appropriate” and that he “(concurs) with their assessment.” He didn’t elaborate during the brief phone conversation. Dannenberg said the details of his departure are being worked out, but he doubts he’ll return to city hall in an official capacity. He’s on a scheduled vacation through next week. The 64-year-old met with the seven-member council in an executive session during their regular July 17 meeting. Under state law, city councils generally can’t meet out of the public eye except in certain cases, such as for some personnel matters. Mayor Rick Hansen said he couldn’t disclose details of what was discussed Tuesday, but “when we came out of that executive session, Ralph said he was going to retire.” On Thursday, Hansen and Deputy Mayor John Knutsen both declined to say anything else about the circumstances, including whether Dannenberg had a choice to remain with the city. Dannenberg began to work as city manager on a temporary basis during spring 2010. His predecessor, Gary McLean, clashed with some on the council and resigned without publicly giving a reason. Dannenberg had been Puyallup’s parks director. As interim city manager, he quickly was faced with an anticipated $5 million city budget shortfall. The city council voted unanimously in October 2010 to keep him on permanently, praising his budget work and his efforts to stabilize the city government. The council has seen significant turnover since then. This year, there are four new faces and a new majority that has undone some of the work of last year’s council. Dannenberg said Thursday that such a transition “is a difficult thing” for a city manager and the whole staff. News of Dannenberg’s departure came during a tense week at the city. At the same council meeting, Hansen accepted an admonishment from his colleagues in response to a report made this spring by a female city employee of “unwelcome contact.” Dannenberg’s staff investigated the report, and Dannenberg followed up with a memo to Hansen in May, advising him to conduct himself appropriately with city employees. Dannenberg also encouraged Hansen to attend “one-on-one training,” which he did. When The News Tribune received the memo in early July through a public records request, Dannenberg declined to describe specifics, citing advice from city attorneys. The city released more details July 17 after a follow-up request from The News Tribune. At least one council member found some fault with how the situation was handled. Knutsen praised Dannenberg’s response to the employee’s complaint but said he “would have preferred that the news media had been handled differently by the city.” Knutsen said once the matter became public, the city should have provided more details more quickly so speculation would end. Under Puyallup’s form of government, the city manager is the chief executive who oversees staff members and daily operations. The city has more than 280 employees. The city manager reports to the council. Dannenberg was Puyallup’s parks director for nearly 13 years before he became city manager. Before that, he spent 20 years working for the City of Pullman. Last year, his gross earnings were $172,027, according to the city. While Dannenberg is on vacation, the city’s finance director will fill in. City staff last week contacted a consulting firm to discuss helping with a search for an interim city manager, city spokesperson Glenda Carino said. Dannenberg had been formally evaluated once since he took the job. Last summer, the council gave him high marks. Council members John Palmer and Kent Boyle both said Thursday they didn’t want to see him go. Dannenberg said he’s pleased with his time as city manager, pointing specifically to his budget work.

Post Falls, Idaho (population 27,574): Post Falls Mayor Clay Larkin told The Press that City Administrator Eric Keck submitted a letter of resignation on July 30, according to The Coeur d’ Alene Press. Larkin said he is saddened by the news of Keck’s departure, that Keck served the city well. Keck was hired in 2006 to replace Jim Hammond. He serves on several community boards including the Boys and Girls Club of Kootenai County. The mayor said Keck has chosen another career path. Larkin would not provide additional details. Keck will remain in the city administrator position through the end of August.

Milton, Massachusetts (population 27,033): After 39 years as a town employee, including 15 years as Police Chief and five years in his most recent position, Kevin Mearn is no longer the Milton Town Administrator, according to the MiltonPatch. Mearn’s one-year contract was not renewed in a Board of Selectmen executive session on July 18. Despite a large show of community support for Mearn, including a petition with 165 signatures, the Selectmen reaffirmed the decision Monday night in a meeting at the Council on Aging. Like the closed-door vote, Chair Tom Hurley was the only vote to keep Mearn. Bob Sweeney and Denis Keohane voted not to renegotiate the contract, which expired on June 30. Throughout the meeting, which included over 30 minutes of comment from the public, a conflict between Mearn and Police Chief Richard Wells Jr. arose as one of the principle reasons Mearn’s contract was not renewed. Following the vote and without directly mentioning Wells, Mearn said the issues began when he pointed out “serious irregularities” by a department head. Sweeney went beyond the rift between Mearn and Wells, stating he had spent the last two years—the length of his current term on the Board of Selectmen—attempting to build a professional relationship with the Town Administrator. “It hasn’t worked,” said Sweeney, who is currently the most senior member of the board. Hurley, who is entering the second year of his three-year term and previously chaired the Warrant Committee, rejected Sweeney’s analysis. Several speakers mentioned the Selectmen’s perceived desire to start a new board with a new Town Administrator. Like those members of the public, Mearn disagreed with the new direction. Many residents rose in support on Mearn Monday including, former Town Administrator John Cronin, former Selectman John Michael Shields, former Fire Chief Malcolm Larsen and members of Mearns family as well as several citizens. Shields, who most recently served on the board from 2006 to 2012 after losing to Keohane by a margin of 49 percent to 46 percent in March, called the move “ill-timed and ill-conceived.” Many of the supporters took time to thank Mearn for his service. Speaking on behalf of his family, Kevin’s son Chris also thanked those in attendance during his statement. Prior to the discussion Monday, Hurley read a letter from Mearn offering to retire one year from the date of his last contract. The suggestion was not considered publicly. Annmarie Fagan, the current Assistant Town Administrator was appointed the interim Town Administrator. The Selectmen, with a recommendation of the Personnel Board, voted to increase her current salary to $125,000 while serving in the vacated position. The Board of Selectmen will compile a list of characteristics they’d like in the next Town Administrator and the creation of a search committee at its next meeting.

Bedford, New Hampshire (population 21,203): After nearly nine months and two searches, the Bedford Town Council has selected its next town manager, according to the BedfordPatch. Jessie W. Levine of Springfield, NH, was chosen after the Council interviewed the four finalists yesterday. Following the decision, the Council met with and authorized Municipal Resources, Inc. (MRI), the firm conducting the search, to negotiate a conditional offer of employment with Levine. This morning, council members were notified she has accepted the offer. Council members is expected to formally vote on the appointment and review and finalize employment terms at the its next meeting, on Aug. 15. Subject to completion of a background check and evidence of general good health, the Council is anticipating that Levine will be on the job as of Tuesday, Sept. 4. Levine holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Dartmouth College and has completed necessary course work for her Master’s Degree in Public Administration at the University of New Hampshire. She currently serves as the Assistant Town Manager and Human Resources Director in Hanover and prior to that she was the Town Administrator for 10 years in New London. Prior to beginning her public management career in New London, Levine was a legal assistant and litigation manager for two Boston law firms, she has served as a member of the Board of the NH Local Government Center, she’s an active member of the Municipal Managers Association of NH and the International City & County Management Association and she’s involved in a number of civic and community service organizations. Levine is also an alumnus of the Leadership NH Program, the recipient of the 2007 ICMA Program Excellence Award and she was designated as one of the 40 Emerging Leaders in NH by the Union Leader/BIA in 2010.

New Kent County, Virginia (population 18,429): District 4 county supervisor Ron Stiers confirmed Wednesday that County Administrator Cabell Lawton resigned from his position Monday night in a special called meeting, during which the supervisors went into closed session, according to The Virginia Gazette. Assistant County Administrator Rodney Hathaway was named interim County Administrator at a Wednesday work session. New Kent Battalion Chief Lisa Baber was also appointed the position of Fire Chief. In addition to serving as the County Administrator, Lawton had also replaced Fire Chief Tommy Hicks last month. Hicks was initially suspended without pay on June 12, following a unanimous closed session vote by the Board of Supervisors on Monday, June 11. Lawton led the internal investigation, and according to Stiers, fired Hicks on June 22.

Beeville, Texas (population 12,863): Deborah Ballí was appointed Beeville city manager during a July 10 meeting by a 3-0 vote of the City Council, according to the Bee-Picayune. Ballí first came to Beeville in 2010 to work as finance director. She replaced Beeville native Robert Aguilar in that position. City Council members who voted to place her in the top management position at City Hall got a solid look at the direction Ballí intends to take the city during their first budget workshop last Thursday evening. At the meeting, the new city manager unveiled a six-goal plan, each of which has a number of suggestions to improve the quality of life here. Goal one calls for making the city a livable, attractive and sustainable place to live. Goal two is to promote economic development in the community by hiring an economic development director for the city and establishing an economic development advisory committee. Goal three would be to make Beeville a safe and prepared community. Goal four would be to maintain excellent, conservative finances while maintaining the efficient delivery of services. Goal five would be to maintain the city’s infrastructure to the highest quality. Goal six is to implement a strategic business plan. With increased income from sales taxes, hotel and motel occupancy taxes and business expansions, Ballí believes this is the time to take advantage of the situation. Ballí was born in Corpus Christi but spent most of her school years in Michigan. She moved back to Corpus Christi, where she attended classes at Del Mar College and Texas A&M University at Corpus Christi. She has worked at several jobs over the years and was an employee in the finance office for the City of Corpus Christi. She is a certified public accountant. Ballí and her husband, George, are looking for a home to buy in Beeville.

Fortuna, California (population 11,926): At a time when Fortuna has had to deal with a $500,000 budget deficit and is in the middle of a major reservoir replacement project, its incoming city manager said he wants to know what issues the city faces before making major changes, according to the Times-Standard. Candelario comes to Fortuna from Guadalupe, a small city in northern Santa Barbara County, where he is currently the city administrator. He will begin his new job as Fortuna’s city manager on Sept. 1. Originally from Hayward, Candelario earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from California State University, Long Beach before becoming an intern for the city of Santa Ana in Orange County. He worked with Santa Ana for about 17 years before moving with his family to San Luis Obispo. Guadalupe hired him in January 2010. Candelario said coming to Fortuna, which is slightly bigger and has a larger staff, was a nice step up for him from Guadalupe. Candelario said one of his challenges in Guadalupe is bringing the city out of debt. According to the Lompoc Record, in 2010 Guadalupe had to deal with a $200,000 budget deficit. Guadalupe also had a $447,000 budget deficit for the 2012-13 fiscal year, according to the Santa Maria Times. Candelario said he has worked for two and a half years to reduce the amount of debt as well as operating deficits Guadalupe has had. The state elimination of redevelopment agencies in February brought Guadalupe’s progress back to square one, he said. The elimination of redevelopment is responsible for the Fortuna’s budget deficit, city officials have said. Calendelario replaces former City Manager Duane Rigge, who retired on June 30. The Fortuna City Council hired former County Administrative Officer Loretta Nickolaus as interim city manager until Candelario starts in September. Under Candelario’s three-year contract, he can be terminated with a majority vote of the council. Candelario will receive an annual base salary of $107,000 with a 3 percent raise in 2013 and a 5 percent raise in 2014 based on performance objectives being met. Candelario will move to Fortuna with his wife and 11-year-old daughter. He has two other children, a son, 22, and a daughter, 17.

Harrisburg, North Carolina (population 11,526): Harrisburg has hired Michael Rose as new Town Administrator, according to the Town web site. Rose comes from Pineville where he oversaw a budget of $25 million and 85 employees. Rose has served in Pineville a total of 13 years, starting as a town planner, then moving on to assistant town administrator. He has served as town administrator for the past six years. Rose is schedule to begin is duties in Harrisburg on August 1st.

Essex Junction, Vermont (population 9,271): The Essex Junction trustees, who are cutting ties with their municipal manager David Crawford, say they “would benefit from new leadership” in the daily operation of the local government, according to newly released public records obtained by the Burlington Free Press. The three-page “termination agreement” says the village “recognizes and appreciates Mr. Crawford’s years of service to the village as manager, but believes that the community would benefit from new leadership and a fresh perspective, especially as the village explores new ideas regarding consolidation and management.” The termination agreement was among a series of documents released by the village of Essex Junction when the Burlington Free Press filed a Vermont Public Records request late last week following the announcement that Crawford is leaving on Oct. 1. The agreement shows Crawford, who is paid $96,408 a year, will receive six months severance pay on or before Oct. 1. He also gets paid for any unused vacation or comp time. The village also agreed to continue to provide health, dental and vision insurance, along with a $50,000 life and disability insurance plan for six months, according to the signed agreement. The settlement terms reflects much of the benefits included in his initial contract. The five Essex Junction trustees approving the termination agreement this month were all elected to the board since Crawford’s hiring in January 2008. The current board has four members that joined since April 2011. The senior member, Village President George Tyler, was first elected in the spring 2008 a few months after Crawford’s hiring. Between June 26 and the announcement last week about Crawford’s departure, the Village trustees held at least six meetings. Four were special meetings — three for “personnel” discussion and one on July 19 to discuss “manager’s agreement revision.” In the two regular meetings, the board’s agenda warned of an executive session to discuss “personnel.” Crawford has been at odds a few times with several board members both before and after they were elected as trustees. The biggest conflict may have been over the village recreation department and whether the village of Essex Junction had fully given it to the school district in 1970, or if it was just to oversee the daily operation. Some were unhappy that the trustees sued the school district in 2011 in an attempt to get a binding legal interpretation of the action taken 40 years ago. Other records released by the village show Crawford’s most recent raise came in March 2011 when he was entitled to a $3,510 increase, but ended up getting a $2,808 because the trustees cited “current economic considerations.” The records showed his performance evaluation was “very good” in March 2011. This year the trustees refused to give Crawford a raise, Tyler and Village Vice President Dan Kerin said Sunday. The village’s announcement to the media and a separate notice to employees, mentioned that Crawford could be retained in a part-time status to oversee some of the projects facing the village. The city of Winooski has hired Crawford to work up to three days a week as its business manager. Crawford, who lives in South Burlington, has more than 45 years experience in both pubic and private sector jobs in Vermont, New Hampshire and Connecticut. His public sector jobs in Vermont included as a town manager in Middlebury for 15 years and in Morristown for three years; business manager for St. Albans City schools for eight years and as commissioner of Public Works in Rutland for three years. The trustees are scheduled to meet at 6:30 Tuesday night at Lincoln Hall at the Essex Five Corners. The future management of the village, including on an interim basis, will be discussed.

Delta County, Colorado (population 8,915): In a brief news release issued Tuesday, the county commissioners announced that Robbie LeValley had officially accepted the county commissioners’ job offer as Delta County administrator, according to the Delta County Independent. County administrator Susan Hansen has announced that she will retire in September after 23 years with county government, 20 of those as county administrator. The position she is leaving has been compensated with pay and benefits in the $100,000 per year range. LeValley is a 23-year employee of Colorado State University Tri River Area Extension and is currently the area livestock and range extension agent. She and her family operate a livestock business south of Hotchkiss.

Freeport, Maine (population 7,879): The town of Freeport has a new manager, according to KeepMeCurrent.com. On Monday, July 30, town officials announced that they have selected Peter Joseph, who is currently the town manager of Lincoln, N.H., as the pick to replace current Town Manager Dale Olmstead, Jr. who will retiring from the job in the fall. Joseph, 30, has been the town manager in Lincoln, N.H., since 2008, and prior to that, he was the assistant to the town administrator in Peterborough, N.H. At a reception to allow the finalists for the position to meet the public earlier this month, Joseph said sought the Freeport position because of the town’s reputation. Joseph’s hiring will not become official until the Town Council ratifies his contract at its next meeting on Tuesday, Aug. 7, at 6:30 p.m., in the council chambers.

Paris, Maine (population 4,427): Selectmen hope to extend a job offer for the position of town manager by early November, according to the Oxford Hills Sun Journal. The Board of Selectmen didn’t vote, but discussed a timeline that would begin advertising for the position next week, leaving plenty of time for interviews, reference checks and background checks before Town Manager Phil Tarr’s contract expires Jan. 3. The board voted in June to give Tarr notice they wouldn’t renew his contract at the end of the year. Without notice, the contract would have been renewed automatically in January. The board also will ask for citizens’ suggestions on what makes a good town manager, which could help the board form questions to ask applicants in interviews. Selectmen said they hope to begin reviewing applications in mid-September and conduct interviews on Sept. 22 and 29. They’ll vote on a schedule for the hiring at the Aug. 13 meeting. Early in the workshop, Selectman Robert Kirchherr said there were good reasons to charge a citizen committee to initially go through applications. He said it would give the message to applicants that residents are active participants in town affairs, and would allow people “who have some experience in hiring and firing people” to be involved in the process. Other selectmen said the board should have an active role throughout the hiring of a new town manager. Chairman Sam Elliot said he’d object to turning the work over to a committee.

Edgewood, New Mexico (population 3,375): After Aug. 20, Karen Mahalick will no longer be employed by the town of Edgewood, according to the Mountain View Telegraph. A decision was made at a special town council meeting on July 23. As of Aug. 20, Mahalick will be replaced by Kay Davis, who worked with Edgewood Mayor Brad Hill when they were both working at the New Mexico Economic Development Department’s housing division. The decision to make the change was approved by councilors Chuck Ring, Sherry Abraham, and Rita-Loy Simmons. Councilor John Abrams abstained from voting. Prior to making the decision to make a change to the town’s top position, Hill said he evaluated the situation for his first four months in office. That included evaluating how the town staff related to each other and other factors.

Wiggins, Colorado (population 893): Wiggins Town Administrator Bill Rogers resigned effective last Friday, which resulted in the Wiggins Board of Trustees deciding during its meeting on Wednesday how to run the town without him, according to The Fort Morgan Times. Trustees voted unanimously to distribute his duties between Wiggins Town Clerk Craig Trautwein and Public Works Director Jon Richardson, at least until the Wiggins water project is finished. Richardson will act as the designated representative to Industrial Facilities Engineering, the firm that is overseeing the construction of the water project meant to replace the town’s failing water wells. He would report to the town on the progress of the construction, transmit instructions to contractors and render decisions in the field. Trautwein would act as the point person with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which gave the town the loan and grant for the water project, and must approve any and all changes to the project. He would take care of the paperwork the town needs done. The board also decided to hire two part-time employees: one to help with office work and one to help with public works, since Trautwein and Richardson would be overwhelmed without help, especially while the water project is under way. In the future, the town might replace the administrator, but anyone who came in now would not be up to speed on the water project, and might take valuable time to train, board members generally agreed. He or she would not have institutional knowledge, Richardson pointed out. A town administrator may be necessary if the town wants to work on its comprehensive plan for the future of the town, which includes needed work on the wastewater system, said Trustee Karol Kopetzky. Trautwein said he and Richardson could handle the basic duties of the town without an administrator as long as they had at least part-time help. The board instructed Trautwein to start advertising for a 24-hour-a-week office position at the rate of $10 an hour, and a public works position at the same rate of pay and hours. Advertisements will run for the next two weeks. He noted this means the town does not have to pay for health insurance for the new employees. He also noted that the pay for the part-time employees could come out of the money formerly paid to Rogers. Kopetzky also suggested that the town retain the services of Nation Engineering to help with any technical consultation over some of the water issues the town faces. Mayor Margarito “Mac” Leon Jr. said he expected that the work load even when the water project is finished might mean that more employees are needed for the foreseeable future. Trautwein warned that the town could not expect to hire a town administrator at the $34,000 a year that Rogers made for the job. Anyone qualified for the job would probably ask $50,000 or more. Some of the trustees talked about giving Trautwein and Richardson additional pay for the additional work they will be taking on. Kopetzky suggested having an outline of their new duties before deciding on any new compensation. In a telephone interview Wednesday evening, Bill Rogers said he left his position because he was tired of the board giving him a hard time, and that the situation was becoming something of a “witch hunt,” full of hostile confrontations. Bill Rogers had said in the past that he would retire when the water project was finished, but at the age of 70 was ready to retire. Rogers said it seemed like the new board of trustees had an agenda coming in to get rid of him and to make the water project look bad.

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Transitions: San Luis Obispo County, CA; Scottsdale, AZ; Fayetteville, NC and more

San Luis Obispo County, California (population 269,637): Dan Buckshi is the new San Luis Obispo County administrative officer, according to CalCoastNews. Buckshi succeeds Jim Grant, who recently announced his plan to retire in September. The county picked  Buckshi, who has served as the assistant county administrative officer for the past two and a half years, over four other candidates, all of whom are currently employed by the county.

Scottsdale, Arizona (population 217,385): Scottsdale City Council July 10 approved a $45,000 severance package for former City Manager David Richert and appointed Dan Worth, the city’s public works director, acting city manager, according to the Scottsdale Independent. Mr. Worth accepted the position under the presumption he would fulfill the role until a recruiting process could find a permanent replacement. Both measures were approved with unanimous votes. Mr. Worth was hired at a base salary of $180,000. Former City Manager Richert submitted his resignation at council’s July 2 meeting. He joined the city in 2008 and served the last two years as city manager. Mr. Richert left his post saying there was not sufficient support by the mayor and city council to remain effective in his position. Scottsdale City Council met with Mr. Richert Monday, July 2 as part of his annual review process. Mr. Worth has been leading the city’s solid waste, street, fleet and facility operations in addition to capital project management. He first came to the city in May of 2004 as the city engineer, responsible for administering the city’s $1 billion capital improvement program. He is 22-year veteran of the United States Army Corps of Engineers, where he was an officer in a variety of engineering and public works leadership positions.

Fayetteville, North Carolina (population 200,564): Fayetteville’s next city manager says the community’s “size, complexity and energy” appeal to him, according to The Fayetteville Observer. Ted Voorhees takes the reins of the state’s sixth-largest city in August. As a deputy city manager in Durham, Voorhees has spent the last decade helping transform Durham’s downtown from empty tobacco factories into offices, apartments and restaurants. City officials said he emerged the top choice among four finalists seeking to succeed Dale Iman, who resigned in March following a tenure of 5 1/2 years. Voorhees, 48, will manage a city with 1,500 employees and a $187 million budget.

Topeka, Kansas (population 127,473): A divided Topeka City Council voted Tuesday evening to hire Jim Colson, the deputy city manager of Glendale, Ariz., as Topeka’s next city manager, according to The Topeka Capital-Journal. Council members voted 6-3 to approve a two-year contract with Colson calling for him to start work Aug. 27 and be paid a salary of $170,000 a year. Council member Sylvia Ortiz suggested residents would “scream” when they saw how much the city would be paying Colson. The annual salary of Topeka’s last permanent city manager, Norton Bonaparte, was $137,500. Colson and the city had negotiated the contract that was approved Tuesday prior to that evening’s meeting. After two years, the contract automatically renews from year to year unless either party notifies the other in writing by July 1 that its terms won’t be extended. The contract calls for the city to provide Colson 10 work days each annually of vacation leave and sick leave, with all unused vacation and sick leave carrying over from year to year. The city agrees to provide Colson a vehicle at its expense for official business use. The city also agrees to pay Colson a lump sum of $28,000 for relocation expenses. Colson becomes Topeka’s second city manager to be hired on more than an interim basis. Voters in August 2004 approved a charter ordinance switching to a city council-manager form of government from a strong mayor-council form. The new government took effect in April 2005, with Neil Dobler serving as interim manager. Bonaparte then was Topeka’s city manager from March 2006 until he left in July, 2011, under a severance agreement he reached with the council. Dan Stanley was interim manager until early last month, when he was replaced by current interim manager Pam Simecka, who plans to return next month to her former job as finance director. The city since February has been under contract with Tallahassee, Fla.-based Bob Murray & Associates to help it find and recruit a permanent manager. The city announced June 21 that the initial list of 49 applicants had been pared to two finalists: Colson, who has been deputy city manager since 2009 of Glendale, Ariz., and Margie Rose, who has been an assistant city manager since 2002 at Corpus Christi, Texas. The council conducted public interviews with Colson and Rose on June 23, then met in executive session that day to discuss the candidates. Colson, a native of Michigan, has been deputy city manager since 2009 at Glendale, which 2010 census records show has a population of about 226,000. Tuesday’s news release from the city of Topeka said Colson was responsible at Glendale for all community development services, such as planning, building safety, engineering, transportation, downtown redevelopment, community revitalization, the city’s airport and code compliance. Colson has a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Northwood University, a master’s of arts in theology from Western Seminary and a master’s of urban planning degree from the University of Michigan.

Westminster, California (population 89,701): The Westminster City Council placed its city manager on administrative leave Monday – giving him two options: termination or retirement, according to The Orange County Register. After a 40-minute special closed session, Mayor Margie Rice and Councilmen Tyler Diep and Tri Ta announced their vote to place City Manager Mitch Waller on paid leave. They named Assistant City Manager Eddie Manfro interim manager. Waller, a former Westminster police chief who has worked for the city for 29 years, will be on paid leave until “he retires or is terminated,” Rice said. Last week, the city finalized the layoffs of 67 employees and continues to face a budget deficit, although that shortfall was cut from $10.4 million to $3.7 million this fiscal year under Waller’s stewardship. The “lion’s share” of the deficit was addressed and “all of our economic indicators are slowly starting to head in the right direction,” Waller said recently. City Council members declined to say after the meeting why they voted to take the action against Waller. In an interview before the closed session, Rice was critical of Waller’s management style. The mayor accused Waller of leaving the council out of the decision-making process during the recent layoffs, but did not blame him for the city’s financial budget woes. Waller sat in the council chamber until council members called him in to give him their decision, which they announced immediately afterward in open session. No one from the public attended. Earlier in the day, Waller addressed the mayor’s criticism, saying he regularly meets with her during a one-on-one weekly meeting and also whenever she is working at City Hall, at least twice a week. Waller said he was surprised by the council’s decision to call for a special closed session and said it was odd that it came soon after Diep presented a request regarding the chief of police post. Diep wanted the council, and not the city manager, to appoint the police chief, but that request never made it to a council discussion. Diep withdrew it from the council’s agenda last month. Police Chief Ron Coopman announced earlier this month that he was retiring from his job at the end of this month. Waller said Diep’s proposal to give the council more control over the police chief would create the potential for conflicts between the council and a chief who would then become “an at-will political appointee … beholden to those who appoint him.” Last week, the city finalized the layoffs of 29 full-time employees, or 12 percent of the workforce, and 38 part-time employees, or 26 percent of Westminster’s part-time staff. Fewer employees will mean reduced services to residents, including slower response to police calls and a “potential for drastic delays” in lower priority calls, officials have said. No sworn personnel were laid off but more than 20 full- and part-time civilian employees were laid off. Immediate effects have included the closure of the City Hall’s mall office and a reduction in the police department’s front lobby hours. Westminster has faced a $1.5 million annual deficit since the recession began in 2008, officials have said. This year, the picture got bleaker. The state abolished all redevelopment agencies. Since the entire city of Westminster was under a redevelopment area, the loss of redevelopment funds raised the community’s budget deficit to about $10.4 million. The layoffs will save the city $3.2 million, and city staff said it had saved an additional $4.1 million with other measures. But Westminster entered the new fiscal year with a $3.1 million deficit. City staff also has considered other measures that the council has rejected: increasing fees for services and hiring a consultant to promote a new tax for the November ballot. In another financial setback, Westminster was forced last week to pay nearly $9 million to the state for money state authorities said was due after the abolishment of redevelopment agencies. Like other cities in the same position, Westminster made the payment “under protest.”

Miami Beach, Florida (population 87,779): The ouster of Miami Beach’s long time city manager could cost taxpayers more than half a million dollars, according to The Miami Herald. Ever since Jorge Gonzalez submitted his resignation following weeks of turmoil, city officials have asked for the value of Gonzalez’s full compensation — the basis for his pending severance. The city’s human resources department has now provided an answer: $501,768.77. In a July 12 email to the city attorney, Human Resources Director and former Gonzalez chief of staff Ramiro Inguanzo attached a spreadsheet that he said “captures the aggregate compensation for 12 months for Jorge.” Among the items included in the spreadsheet: Gonzalez’s $231,000 salary; $50,000 in insurance policies; $24,000 housing allowance; $56,000 in annual paid time off; and $62,600 related to his public pension. Inguanzo said everything in the spreadsheet was pulled from the city’s payroll system, except for a list of Gonzalez memberships and subscriptions paid for by the city that Gonzalez valued at $12,654. Commissioners will discuss Gonzalez’s compensation during their Wednesday meeting at City Hall, 1700 Convention Center Dr. The value of Gonzalez’s compensation is key due to the circumstances surrounding his resignation. Gonzalez, who ran the city for nearly a dozen years, stepped down amid a push for him to resign or be fired. His contract expired in August of next year, but called for him to receive a severance of “12 months aggregate compensation” if he resigned “following a suggestion, whether formal or informal, by the city that he resign.” So questions have not been about whether he would receive a severance, but about how much he would receive. Gonzalez, however, said he has not made any demands for severance or claimed a final aggregate compensation total. He said his talks with city lawyers have not yet focused on which items — or at what value — should be part of his severance. Gonzalez officially resigned July 8. He remains on the city’s employee rolls while burning accrued time off worth more than $100,000. City Attorney Jose Smith said members of the city’s legal staff and a private attorney met Monday afternoon with Gonzalez and had a 30-minute, “very preliminary conversation.” He declined to comment on individual items on Gonzalez’s compensation list. Some city commissioners said they were surprised at the overall figure provided by human resources, even though all but Commissioner Jorge Exposito voted at least once to amend Gonzalez’s contract. It isn’t yet clear if city commissioners will vote on Gonzalez’s severance. Gonzalez said his contract calls for his severance to be arbitrated should he and Smith not agree on his package. Smith, however, said it is likely that commissioners will vote on at least some aspects of Gonzalez’s severance, or vote to send the parties to an arbitrator. Also Wednesday, commissioners also are slated to vote on an interim manager contract for Kathie Brooks, who is leaving her position as budget director to run the city while commissioners hunt for a permanent replacement. Brooks’ contract is worth $220,000 annually, though it only runs through mid-January and can only be extended by a vote of the city commission.

Troup County, Georgia (population 67,044): Assistant County Manager Tod Tentler dropped the assistant title after former County Manager Mike Dobbs retired last week, according to the LaGrange News. Tentler was unanimously approved at Tuesday’s County Commission meeting to succeed Dobbs as county manager. Tentler came from Columbus to Troup County as parks and recreation director in 1998. In July 2007 he received the additional duty of assistant county manager. Tentler said the main challenges he will face as manager is overseeing the county during tough economic times. He added that national and state mandates coming down the line are putting more pressure on local governments to “pick up the slack.”

Huntington Park, California (population 58,114): The City Council Monday night approved a three-year contract with Rene Bobadilla to serve as its first permanent city manager since last December, according to the Los Angeles Wave. Bobadilla is currently city manager in El Monte and is expected to assume his new duties the first week in September. Bobadilla has agreed to a lesser salary, $196,392, than he currently receives. Bobadilla also will receive medical, dental and vision insurance benefits. Other benefits are the use of a car leased by the city for commuting or traveling on city business. Bobadila also will have a cell phone. The City Council approved the contract on a 5-0 vote after a brief closed session on the issue. Huntington Park has not had a permanent manager since Greg Korduner retired at the end of last year. Police Chief Jorge Cisneros served as city manager for a time, followed by interim administrators Raul Romero and currently Mary Strenn. The latter two are retired administrators. Bobadilla is expected to be available at all times, the contract states. He’s also expected to “be reasonably active” in professional and civic organizations. He does not have to live in Huntington Park, but must have a permanent residence nearby, the contract states. Bobadilla may accrue sick leave at the rate of eight hours per month and accumulate vacation leave with 12.66 hours of service a month. He will be a member of the Public Employees Retirement System and may retire at age 55 with a pension of 2 percent of his final salary. He must contribute 1.5 percent of his salary toward his pension.

Port Arthur, Texas (population 53,818): Six months and one day without an official City Manager in Port Arthur, and Monday, Floyd Johnson was welcomed on his first day on the job, according to KIII TV. Floyd Johnson says he has worked as a city official from Florida to California. He was City Redevelopment Director in two Florida cities, but he was also City Manager in Fort Lauderdale. He was forced to resign in 2003 for late responses to budget issues, but Johnson says city leaders rejected a budget he felt was more responsible. Now he’s ready to start work in Port Arthur, replacing 15 year City Manager Steve Fitzgibbons. Fitzgibbons left after receiving a $220,000 severance package after threatening to sue. Johnson, a Virginia native, says that improvement begins by providing reliable services to the people of Port Arthur. Services like trash pickup after trucks broke down leaving garbage piling up, and public transit. Port Arthur bus services were stopped for three weeks because of mechanical issues causing city buses to catch fire. Now the city is leasing buses from New Orleans until Port Arthur works out a solution with their bus manufacturer. Long term, Johnson says he can see Pleasure Island becoming an attraction for tourists. Johnson’s annual salary is $155,000 a year. He received moving expenses of $12,000. He also gets a housing allowance of $1,000 a month for up to six months.

Sarasota, Florida (population 51,917): Thomas Barwin, the former village manager of Oak Park, Ill., has been selected as Sarasota’s new city manager, according to the Herald-Tribune. In contrast to their earlier vote to start a new search for better candidates, city commissioners chose Barwin unanimously this go-around, praising his record of building consensus and his history in redevelopment. Barwin has about three decades of experience leading local governments in Michigan and Illinois. He faces a tough job, with divisions lingering in the wake of the ouster of Robert Bartolotta, who was forced to resign in January amid allegations that he violated public records and computer fraud laws. Barwin also will be at the mercy of his five bosses — the city commission — who have struggled to agree on everything from whether Sarasota’s downtown should be lined with parking meters to the hiring of a city manager. Sarasota also faces another deficit year, rising retiree pension and medical costs and the specter of criminal investigations by the FBI, Florida Department of Law Enforcement and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. For evidence of how tough his job will be, look no further than Monday’s meeting agenda. In the same day Barwin was selected, two city commissioners — Terry Turner and Paul Caragiulo — pushed for competing ballot measures that could either give Barwin more authority as a so-called “strong city manager” or make him potentially unnecessary under an elected mayor. The strong city manager amendment, which was supported by Turner and local business and pro-growth groups, gathered enough signatures to make the November ballot. Caragiulo’s attempt to get a strong mayor referendum on the ballot failed to get enough support from commissioners to make the ballot. Still, Barwin said he is not sweating. Barwin’s hire is not yet final. The city will now enter into negotiations with Barwin, who hopes to take over the helm by late August or early September. His salary could range from $150,000 to $180,000 per year. Once his contract is finalized, Barwin will move from Illinois with his wife of 32 years, Margaret. Barwin has four adult sons. In hiring Barwin, the commission snubbed the other finalist, Edward Mitchell, the longtime city administrator of West Palm Beach. In their discussions, commissioners voiced reservations about hiring Mitchell, who kept his job after a corruption and a pay-to-play-scheme occurred under his watch. A special meeting is scheduled for July 30 to finalize Barwin’s selection. If he signs a contract then, Barwin hopes to move to Sarasota within 30 days. His willingness to take the job quickly eases fears that arose after Interim City Manager Terry Lewis said he would not stay during a second search for city manager candidates. That process that could have left Sarasota leaderless until the end of the year.

Hillsborough Township, New Jersey (population 38,303): Former Hillsborough Mayor Anthony Ferrera has been named the new township administrator, according to the Hillsborough Patch. Ferrera, who served on the Township Committee from 2004 to 2011 and as mayor in 2007 and 2008, will replace Michael Merdinger. Ferrera, now serving as director of the Division of Workforce Portfolio and Contract Management in the state Department of Labor, will take over the $124,000 township post on Aug. 20. Merdinger will leave at the end of August. Ferrera, a Republican, was unanimously approved by the all-GOP Township Committee. Ferrera, who earned a master’s degree in business administration from Stevens Institute of Technology, had a 20-year career with AT&T before joining the state. Ferrera also served on the township Planning Board, the Business and Economic Development Commission, the Recreation Commission and the Cultural Arts Commission. On the Township Committee, he served as chairman of the police committee and the finance committee.

Puyallup, Washington (population 37,022): Pierce County’s third-largest city soon will be in the market for a new chief executive, according to The News Tribune. Puyallup City Manager Ralph Dannenberg apparently is leaving his post after nearly two years. The city has contacted a consulting firm to help search for an interim city manager. Dannenberg, 64, became city manager in the fall of 2010 after filling the post on a temporary basis for about six months. Before that, he was Puyallup’s parks director for nearly 13 years and worked for the City of Pullman for two decades, including as director of public services. Since Dannenberg took over in Puyallup, he’s navigated budget cuts and a new political landscape. The seven-member City Council has four news faces and a new majority this year, and has reversed several policies established by last year’s council. Puyallup’s finance director, Cliff Craig, is filling in as acting city manager.

Jackson, Michigan (population 33,534): Jackson City Manager Larry Shaffer said he’s enjoyed his 13 months as the city’s top administrator and is in no way being forced out, according to MLive.com. Tuesday night, the Jackson City Council approved a separation agreement that clears the way for his Aug. 3 departure. The severance agreement will cost $64,000. Shaffer said his decision to leave was a result of him reexamining what he wants to do with the rest of his life. Mayor Martin Griffin said Tuesday it became evident during the 2012-13 budget process that some council members had differences with the city manager. At a City Council meeting in May in which the budget was discussed, Councilman Dan Greer chastised Shaffer, saying it looked like a position the council didn’t want had been “tried to be slipped in,” although Greer later said his comments sounded stronger than he intended. But Shaffer said any issues council members had with his budget had little effect on his decision. Councilwoman Laura Dwyer Schlecte said during a June council meeting that Shaffer’s job performance review by council members “wasn’t stellar.” But council members later said that most were satisfied with his performance, and Griffin said Shaffer’s overall rating was about 3.1 on a scale with 5 being the highest. Councilman Carl Breeding said then he was dissatisfied with Shaffer’s performance, but others were not. Shaffer said he has been discussing his desire to leave with council members over the last couple of weeks. The City Council met with Shaffer behind closed doors during Tuesday’s council meeting for about 20 minutes. They returned to open session and approved a separation agreement without any discussion. Shaffer said that the city manager job is demanding and he had to consider whether he wanted to continue working a job that requires 50- to 60-hour work weeks.

Taos County, New Mexico (population 32,937): Taos County has begun its search for a new manager, and the county is keeping mum as to whether any other employees are slated for termination, according to The Taos News. Outgoing county manager Jacob Caldwell was given 45 days notice of his termination and placed on immediate administrative leave at the county commission’s July 10 meeting. No explanation for Caldwell’s termination was given at the meeting. A termination letter dated July 11 and signed by commission chairman Joe Mike Durán stated that Caldwell was being terminated “for cause” and referenced a clause in Caldwell’s contract. The contract stipulates that Caldwell could only be let go if he “is indicted for a crime, does not work, is grossly insubordinate or is unable to perform the duties of county manager.” The letter from Durán did not specify which reason the commission was citing in terminating Caldwell. Durán told The Taos News Tuesday (July 17) that the commission had a good reason for letting Caldwell go. Durán declined to go into greater detail out of concern that the county would have to pay the remaining time (until Feb. 2013) on Caldwell’s $110,000 annual contract. Commissioners Larry Sánchez and Andrew Chávez said they could not comment on the reasons for Caldwell’s termination. Commissioner Nicklos Jaramillo did not return multiple messages seeking comment. Chávez lost a reelection bid in the June primary and will also give up his seat in January. Jaramillo will term out at the beginning of next year. Incoming commissioner Tom Blankenhorn, who won the June primary in District 4, said last week he was worried that the current commission sought to fire other county employees before the end of the year. A handful of county employees have said they have heard they may be next to go, but no additional terminations had been made since last Tuesday. County administrators did not respond to questions to confirm if other employees had been let go, or if certain employees had been targeted for dismissal. The county posted the manager job July 12 — two days after Caldwell was given notice of termination. The job posting is set to close Aug. 17. The listing says a manager will “typically enter into a contractual term of employment,” meaning a new manager could be contracted to work well after the new commissioners take office. Interim Taos County Manager Barbara Martínez, who was appointed to temporarily replace Caldwell, said no one had yet applied for the manager job. The minimum requirements in the county manager job listing include a “master’s in degree [sic] public administration, political science, business administration, finance, law or a closely related field.” The listing states that candidates with eight years of “progressively responsible experience” in state or local government are preferred. It also states that “an equivalent combination of education and experience may be considered by the Taos County Commissioners.” The Taos County Commission typically interviews a final field of candidates in private before offering someone the manager job.

Monroe, North Carolina (population 32,797): Wayne Herron has resigned as Monroe’s city manager after more than three years on the job, according to WCNC.com. City officials confirmed Wednesday that Herron resigned at the end of Monroe’s city council meeting Tuesday night. Two assistant city managers have been appointed to run government operations until a replacement is hired. Herron did not give a reason for his resignation, but he had come under criticism from some Monroe residents for recommending against a $3,000 performance bonus for Police Chief Debra Duncan. In a 4-3 vote last month, the city council rejected a proposal to award the bonus to Duncan. Several council members said their vote against the bonus was based on Herron’s recommendation. Herron was hired as planning service manager in 2001 and was promoted to assistant city manager in 2008. He became city manager in April 2009. His salary was about $150,000.

Hermosa Beach, California (population 19,506): The top administrator for a popular resort town in Utah is expected to become the next city manager in Hermosa Beach, according to the Inland Valley Daily Bulletin. Tom Bakaly, the city manager in Park City, Utah, was set to have his contract approved Tuesday by the Hermosa Beach City Council. More than 75 candidates applied for the open Hermosa Beach city manager’s post, and the council interviewed four of the top contenders. Bakaly, 48, will earn a base salary of $185,000, with an additional maximum 7 percent bonus awarded annually at the council’s discretion, sources said. Bakaly joined Park City’s staff as finance manager and director of capital programs in 1995, rising to the position of assistant city manager in 2001. He was named city manager in 2002 and oversees a staff of 200 full-time city workers and a $45 million annual budget. Hermosa Beach has an annual budget of about $37 million. The beach town’s former city manager, Steve Burrell, retired in March after 18 years on the job. John Jalili, a former top administrator in Santa Monica, was tapped by the council to fill in as Burrell’s interim replacement. Bakaly visited Hermosa Beach twice during the interview process, and the city paid for both trips. After Burrell’s retirement, city officials hired a recruiting firm, Teri Black and Co., for $17,500 to search for his permanent replacement. Before coming to Park City, Bakaly worked for seven years for the city of Pasadena, serving in various positions, including budget director during the recession of the 1990s, Hermosa Beach city leaders said. In Pasadena, he helped oversee the management of large sporting events held there, including the World Cup, Rose Bowls and Super Bowls. In Park City, he prepared the community for the 2002 Winter Olympics and the popular Sundance Film Festival. Bakaly, who grew up in Pasadena, earned a master’s degree in public administration with a specialization in public financial management from USC. He is married to Pam Bakaly, and they have a teenage son, Henry. If his contract is approved by the Hermosa Beach City Council, Bakaly is expected to begin his new job in early September.

Camas, Washington (population 19,355): The Mayor of Camas, Scott Higgins, has chosen to keep the current City Administrator, Lloyd Halverson, in his current position until Spring of 2013, according to the Silver Star Reporter. Camas City officials announced today that after culling through 51 applications for the position of City Administrator, and narrowing the field to two, Erik Jensen and Craig Martin, it was decided by Higgins that neither  “were the right fit for Camas’ future.” Erik Jensen of Portland is the former administration department director for the City of Hillsboro, Ore., and Craig Martin of Sweet Home, Ore. is the current Sweet Home city manager.  Both were interviewed by Higgins on Thursday, July 12. According to a statement released by the City, Higgins said he intended to pause and reflect before starting a new search. The statement also added that city officials did not “find any of the finalists as suitable to the challenges and opportunities which lie ahead for the city of Camas.” Lloyd Halverson, 65,  was hired as Camas’ first city administrator in 1989, and announced his plans at the City Retreat in January that he intended to transition toward retirement, first becoming part-time by September of 2012, and ending his employment in Spring of 2013.

Greene County, Virginia (population 18,403): Greene County Administrator Barry Clark sent out an e-mail last week announcing his resignation, according to CBS19. He simply said he was leaving his position effective November 30 and would be on administrative leave in the meantime. Some people in the county said they were shocked by the news. One county employee said that he too was worried about his job. In addition to the County Administrator’s sudden resignation, the Public Safety Director Dave Lawrence has been given a two-week notice after 12 years serving the county. His position has apparently been consolidated with others. He was told on July 13 that his last day will be July 31. No one at the County Administration Office would comment, but people in the community have some concerns. Crystal Morris, Greene County business owner, says she would like to know who will be the next County Administrator, but so far no official word on even an interim person for the position. CBS19 has reached out to the members of the Board of Supervisors but has not heard back yet from any of them. They do have a board meeting Tuesday night beginning at 5:30 p.m. The agenda was posted on the door of the County Office Building. Legal or personnel matters will be discussed first in executive session.

Longmeadow, Massachusetts (population 15,784): The Select Board voted Monday night to enter into contract negotiations with town manager finalist Thomas Guerino, but the decision did not come easily, according to MassLive.com. The board spent over an hour discussing Guerino and fellow finalist Mark Stankiewicz. There were two failed motions, one in favor of Stankiewicz that was not supported by any other members and a motion in favor of Guerino which failed 3-2. There must be a super majority for the town manager vote. Select Board Chairman Paul Santaniello said he was not willing to endorse either candidate. Santaniello said he would like to see the board hire an interim manager and begin a new search in December. The rest of the board was strongly against Santaniello’s suggestion. Members Marie Angelides, Mark Barowsky and Richard Foster favored Guerino, the town administrator in Bourne, while Mark Gold favored Stankiewicz, who is the former town manager in Plymouth. Foster and Santaniello went to both candidates’ communities last week to meet with their boards and department heads. Foster said he felt strongly that Guerino would fit the needs of Longmeadow. Angelides agreed saying he is very involved with the day to day operations in Bourne and has found creative ways to save the town money which Longmeadow also needs. Barowsky said he felt comfortable with Guerino from the first interview and felt his answers to questions were frank and honest. Gold said he has strong reservations about Guerino, but was unwilling to share them publicly with the board. He said Stankiewicz was a town manager not a town administrator and had more experience. He initially voted against Guerino. After more discussion including the possibility of delaying the vote to later in the week or the month Gold said that with great disappointment he would be willing to change his vote. Santaniello stood by his decision to not vote for either candidate. Angelides said both were good candidates and this does not rule out Stankiewicz if Guerino and the town cannot come to a contract agreement.

Brunswick, Georgia (population 15,383): Brunswick City Manager Bill Weeks has completed a six-month probationary period successfully and will get the job permanently depending on contract negotiations, according to The Florida Times-Union. The City Commission voted unanimously to make the appointment after a brief executive session during its regular meeting. Weeks, formerly assistant city manager, became acting city manager in September 2011 when Roosevelt Harris retired after 36 years on the city payroll. Weeks held the job while the commission searched for a permanent replacement for Harris, a process that saw Thompson and former Commissioner Mark Spaulding apply for the job. Thompson pulled out of the running, but Spaulding remained until the commission seemed ready to offer the job to Paul White of Riviera Beach, Fla. But in January, the commission decided to offer the post to Weeks instead. Among the biggest is the strong likelihood of a court battle with the County Commission over division of 1 cent sales tax proceeds.

Washington, Illinois (population 15,134): Bob Morris is retiring again as city administrator, according to the Journal Star. He says this time it’s for good. Morris, 60, initially retired June 22, 2011, after nine years with the city and was replaced by Richard Downey, who lasted only seven weeks. Downey resigned Aug. 15. He was given a severance package by Washington worth more than $60,000 in exchange for a promise not to sue the city or talk about his time as city administrator. He was placed on administrative leave before his resignation “to pursue pressing personal and family matters,” according to the five-sentence news release issued after a City Council meeting. City officials asked Morris to return on an interim basis and he’s served in the capacity since Sept. 12. He’s retiring July 31 because he’s approaching the 1,000-hours-per-year employment limit imposed on those who draw a pension from the Illinois Municipal Retirement Fund and work again in government. The City Council accepted Morris’ retirement request last week and initiated a search for a full-time city administrator. Mayor Gary Manier said the council will be more actively involved in the vetting and hiring process this time. The deadline to apply is Aug. 17. If the candidate offered the job can’t begin immediately because the school year has started, Manier said, it’s possible another interim city administrator could be hired. Morris said his workload began to pick up early this year as the 2012-2013 budget and summer projects started needing attention. He was supposed to work 20 hours per week at $50 per hour. Downey was selected for the Washington job among 69 candidates. He was being paid an annual salary of $100,000, a tripling of the $33,000 salary he was making as the Rock Falls city administrator, a job he’d held since 2003. He was a finalist for several openings after he left Washington and was hired as village administrator in Kronewetter, Wis., on Feb. 6. He’s making an annual salary of $82,500.

Ontario, Oregon (population 11,366): Ontario city officials anticipate receiving a signed contract today for the person offered the city manager’s position, according to The Argus Observer. The Ontario City Council decided to offer the position to Jay Henry, the former city manager of Talent, Ore., council President Norm Crume said Monday. Crume was speaking for Mayor Joe Dominick, who is out of town. He said, as of Monday, the city had not received a signed agreement from Henry, but, if everything goes according to plan, Henry, Central Point, will start working for the city Monday. He replaces former City Manager Henry Lawrence. The City Council hired Prothman Company, a consulting firm, to conduct the city manager’s search. Out of 33 applications, Prothman brought 10 names to the council, with five considered strong candidates. Two of those five dropped out and the city’s hiring committee interviewed three final candidates for the position: Henry, Jeff Fiegenschuh, Princeton, Ill., and Jim Payne, Rio Rancho, N.M. Crume said the council initially began discussions with Fiegenschuh, but he was no longer interested in the position. Crume said it was the City Council’s unanimous consensus to offer the position to Henry. Crume said Henry’s wife, an internal medicine physician, is also moving to Ontario, and he believes she has been hired at Saint Alphonsus Medical Center-Ontario. Crume said Henry is ideal because he is familiar with Ontario, having attended Treasure Valley Community College, he knows Oregon and has been a city manager in Oregon. Before becoming a city manager, Henry worked in public works and community development for Klamath County and attended Marylhurst University to obtain his masters of business administration and also attended the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. In 2007, Henry was hired as the first city manager of Polson, Mont., but he and his wife, Evelyn, moved back to Oregon after their 19-year-old son died. Henry was the city manager for Talent from 2008 to 2011, but his contract was not renewed under tense circumstances. According to June 4 article in the Ashland Daily Tidings, Henry was accused by a council member of violating his contract, and an elections complaint and a civil rights complaint were filed against Henry. Henry and city officials, however, worked out their differences. According to an article published on the Portland Tribune website in January of this year, Henry, however, was named in a $1.9 million lawsuit in which former city employee Cheryl Nicolay who claimed Henry fired her “after their working relationship bogged down following a contentious labor negotiation.” Crume said, during the interview process, Henry explained the circumstances behind his departure from Talent. He said, according to Henry, when he was hired in Talent, he dismissed a long-time city employee whom he felt was not doing her job properly, and that employee had ties with community members who were later elected to the City Council and then chose to not renew his contract. Crume said he was satisfied with Henry’s explanation. He said Henry will be paid $95,000 a year base salary, which is similar to Lawrence’s starting salary as city manager. Ontario City Councilman David Sullivan said he was pleased Henry was selected as city manager, adding Henry interviewed well, he understands budgeting and personnel issues very well and he also has a network with other city managers in Oregon, which Sullivan said is important.

Shawano, Wisconsin (population 9,305): Michael Hall is no longer administrator for the city of Shawano, according to The Shawano Leader. There had been a closed session of the Shawano Common Council on Tuesday on a personnel matter, but it had not listed anything specific regarding Hall. Hall was chosen from five finalists and hired unanimously in May 2011 by the Common Council to replace Jim Stadler, who was retiring. Hall’s first day with Shawano was June 27, 2011. Prior to taking the administrator post, Hall was the financial and technology manager in West Jordan, Utah. He also worked as a fleet manager, public works analyst and finance management analyst. Hall has a master’s degree in public administration from the University of Utah. He also has a bachelor’s degree in political science from Colorado State University and an associate degree in computer science from Ricks College in Idaho. At the time Hall was hired, Mayor Lorna Marquardt said she contacted a number of people in West Jordan to find out some background on him and received only positive comments. Hall said the night the council approved his employment that he was interested in being Shawano’s administrator because of the city’s good fiscal status. When the state cut about $270,000 from Shawano’s shared revenues, Hall’s ideas to fill that hole included controversial proposals such as eliminating the city taxicab service and creating a stormwater utility. Ultimately, the taxi service survived and the Common Council opted to assess a $100 annual fee for the city’s trash service. Hall also was working to reduce the amount of paper generated by City Hall. For example, he purchased 12 iPads for the mayor, aldermen and department heads to reduce the monthly packets of information for council members. Hall is the second major city figure in Shawano to resign in less than a year. Marlene Brath left in November after 20 years as the city clerk for, according to Marquardt, health reasons.

Morehead City, North Carolina (population 8,661): A new manager with 35 years experience in local government is headed to Morehead City, according to The Daily News. The town announced Wednesday that David S. Whitlow, who currently serves as county administrator for Essex County in northern neck of Virginia, has been selected as the town’s next manager. He will begin work Sept. 4. There were 91 candidates for the position and Whitlow was one of three finalists. Whitlow will follow former Manager Randy Martin, who retired earlier this year after 16 years with the town. Martin took a job as city manager in Franklin, Va. after closing out a 30-year career in local government in North Carolina. Now, Whitlow will bring his experience from Virginia to North Carolina. According to the town, Whitlow has 35 years experience in local government management and has worked in private sector planning positions. During the selection process, 91 applicants were narrowed to six finalists who spent considerable time in Morehead City being interviewed by the mayor and council. The initial set of interviews narrowed the finalists to three. Whitlow will be paid an annual salary of $95,000.

Thief River Falls, Minnesota (population 8,573): The Thief River Falls City Council accepted the resignation of City Administrator Jodie Torkelson at its meeting Tuesday, July 17, according to The Times. Torkelson submitted her resignation after it was learned 69 out of 73 employees had no confidence in her continuing service as city administrator. Torkelson had been employed as the city administrator since October 2003. Her last day will be Friday, Sept. 28. Four city employees appeared before the council at its July 3 meeting to present a resolution regarding the vote of no confidence. They were cut off by Mayor Steve “Beaver” Nordhagen, who noted the matter should be discussed in committee. Personnel matters are typically discussed in committee before being considered by the full council. The Times and Thief River Falls Radio obtained copies of the employees’ resolution. The resolution indicated that the employees were forced to have a vote of no confidence in Torkelson due to their low morale, the ongoing conflict and adversarial climate existing in city government, and the fallout of having to cope with disputes caused by Torkelson’s management and leadership style. The letter also indicated her leadership style has cost the city “considerable amounts of wasted money, time and resources, including, but not necessarily limited to, attorney’s fees and related expenses, wasted staff time and wasted City Council time, in dealing with and addressing unnecessary and petty issues and conflicts which have been caused by the city administrator’s abrasive, dictatorial, disrespectful, corrosive, vindictive, intimidating, adversarial, difficult and overly micromanaging leadership and management style.”

Georgetown, Ohio (population 4,331): The city administrator of Wells may have resigned for a personal matter, but he also has a job waiting for him back in Ohio, according to the Faribault County Register.. According to The News Democrat newspaper in Georgetown, Ohio, the council voted June 28 to hire Jeremy Germann as the town’s new administrator. Kelly Jones, who is retiring as the city administrator on Aug. 1 after serving 11 years, says he was among those who interviewed Germann on June 25. Georgetown is located 35 miles east of Cincinnati and has a population of nearly 4,500. Germann will be paid $64,000 a year, plus benefits. In all, 22 people applied for the position and the field was narrowed to seven finalists. Germann reportedly signed a contract to be presented for approval at the July 5 Georgetown council meeting. On July 9, Germann submitted his letter of resignation to the Wells City Council. He made no mention of employment in Ohio. Mayor Ron Gaines says he was not aware Germann had applied or had accepted another job prior to resigning. Germann was in the last year of a three-year contract and was being paid an annual salary of $71,000, plus benefits. The agreement called for Germann to give the city a 30-day advance notice. “We didn’t enforce it, because of his personal matter,” Gaines says. Due to four resignations, only two councilman unanimously voted to hire Germann. One council member stepped down to run for county commissioner and the other three applied for the city administrator’s position. Two council members who did not get the job have been re-appointed to their seats.

Grand Saline, Texas (population 3,136): Grand Saline resident Rex White begins work as the new city manager July 18, according to The Grand Saline Sun. He accepted the position recently vacated by Stephen Ashley who resigned and moved to a position in Spring Valley, Texas. White said he applied for the City Manager position becaus he realized that for the city council to retain the services of a search firm would have entailed a substantial fee in addition to the time it would take the search firm to find a qualified candidate. Budget planning time needs to begin immediately for the next fiscal year. White recognized that his salary would save the city a significant amount each year and further work that needs to be done here. White served as the Main Street program manager and community development coordinator for the town from January 2008 until July 2009. He volunteered in earlier years as a director of the Grand Saline Economic Development Corporation, a director of the Chamber of Commerce, a director of the Salt Museum, member and president of the GSISD Board of Trustees. He retired from a 28-year career with several divisions of Morton Salt International. When he retired in December 2007 he was the national accounts sales manager for the entire nation and Puerto Rico. In that position he planned and administered an operating budget of more than $20 million and managed sales totaling $163.7 million. He began his career with Morton Salt in Grand Saline in 1984 as an account executive. He is a 1962 graduate of Grand Saline High School. He was recently elected to a second term of service on the City Council. He now vacates that position, and the Council has decided to not fill it in the immediate future.

Myrtle Point, Oregon (population 2,514): After three years behind the wheel, city manager John Walsh is departing to take the helm of a slightly larger vessel, according to The World. Walsh will take over as city manager of St. Helens, Ore., at the end of this month, a move spurred by his desire to be closer to family in Portland. But Walsh, Myrtle Point’s city manager since 2009, said it wasn’t an easy decision to make. Walsh listed his proudest achievement as the consummation of a deal that paid for the majority of a $12.2 million wastewater upgrade the city must implement to meet environmental regulations. To pay for the project, household sewer bills were expected to skyrocket to an average of $150 per month. Thanks to grants and loans that Walsh secured, households are paying about $55 per month. Walsh said he expected to face new challenges at the city of St. Helens. The town, nestled on the Columbia River, has a population of 12,380 — about 10,000 more than Myrtle Point. St. Helens council does not have any major infrastructure projects on its plate, so Walsh expects he will focus largely on community building and improving efficiency. Myrtle Point already has advertised a vacancy for a new city manager. The council plans to finalize a short list of candidates in a meeting on Monday night. Walsh will work for Myrtle Point part-time in August to smooth the transition between city managers. The new manager is likely to begin in August.

Wells, Minnesota (population 2,343): Jeremy Germann has resigned as city administrator of Wells, effective July 27, according to The Free Press. The City Council has hired former Shorewood City Administrator Brian Heck as interim administrator. Germann is in the final year of a three-year contract paying an annual salary of $71,000. Germann, who has been involved in the transition process with Heck, told city officials he’s stepping down for personal reasons.

Miniok, Illinios (population 2,078): The City Council approved a one-year contract for a new city administrator with a starting salary of $65,000, according to pantagraph.com. Gary Brennan was scheduled to start work July 16.

Dewey Beach, Delaware (population 341): After a search that lasted more than six months to get a town manager in Dewey Beach in place in time for the summer, the town council’s top pick didn’t survive it, according to DelMarVaNOW. Town manager Bob Stickels submitted his resignation letter to the Dewey Beach town council late Wednesday afternoon, July 25. Stickels started as Dewey Beach town manager April 9, after signing an 18-month contract with the town that included a mutual option for an additional year. His salary was $85,000. Stickels replaced Diana Smith, who resigned in September 2011. Between Smith and Stickels, police chief Sam Mackert, finance director Bill Brown and property owner Jim Dedes had stints as acting town manager. Stickels came to Dewey Beach from the office of U.S. Rep. John Carney, D-Del., where he was the coordinator for Kent and Sussex counties. He previously spent 18 years as the administrator of Sussex County — from 1988 to 2006 — and six years as Georgetown’s town manager.