Transitions: Lehigh County, PA; Henderson, NV; Blount County, AL and more

Lehigh County, Pennsylvania (population 349,497): Bill Hansell keeps landing in jobs no one elected him to, but that doesn’t mean he isn’t qualified to do them, according to The Morning Call. The new Lehigh County executive is a veteran of local government who vows to depoliticize the office during his short tenure, which will begin with his swearing-in Tuesday. His ascent, onlookers joke, makes him the Gerald Ford of local government. Hansell, a Democrat, was appointed a Lehigh County commissioner and later chose not to run for the seat. Less than a year later, on Aug. 8, the commissioners named him county executive to replace Don Cunningham, who resigned to run the Lehigh Valley Economic Development Corp. Ford famously became vice president and then president without benefit of the ballot box. That Hansell, who is 75 and declares himself an unapologetic New Deal liberal, managed to garner that appointment speaks to his ability to deliver despite the ideological rift between him and the board’s most conservative members. That may be his key strength. Vic Mazziotti, a member of the board’s conservative reform slate, was absolute in his opposition to Hansell because of that deep political divide. Over two weeks, Hansell flipped Mazziotti, who joined in on what would be a unanimous vote. Hansell said that in conversations with Mazziotti, he stressed their shared vision of how government should be run. For the next 16 months, Hansell pledges to be a manager, not a politician. Early in his career, Hansell was borough manager in Catasauqua and then South Whitehall Township manager. He’s served as business administrator for Allentown and worked for 20 years with the International City/County Management Association. Commissioners have praised him for his encyclopedic knowledge of local government rules, structure and obligations. He helped write Northampton County and Easton’s home rule charters. Hansell was raised by deeply Catholic, Great Depression-era parents. He attended the University of Pennsylvania on a full scholarship based on merit and a disability — he has little vision in his left eye. His mother stayed home while his father worked three jobs, including as a firefighter for the security of a pension. In Mazziotti’s initial opposition to Hansell, he warned that the candidate’s philosophical positions are “diametrically opposed” to his and other members of the board, which is 7-2 Republican. As a commissioner, for example, Hansell voted for the 16 percent tax increase in the 2011 budget that energized the board’s new conservative slate to unseat commissioners who supported that plan. Rolling back that tax increase would be the centerpiece of their campaigns. Hansell, however, reassured Mazziotti that to the extent possible, “99.9 percent,” he would function as a county manager, not a politician. A manager doesn’t attempt to dominate the board or fight partisan battles, but rather serves at the pleasure of the board. Still, at least one observer says Mazziotti and other commissioners can take Hansell’s word that he will eschew politics for policy. Given Hansell’s short stint — he doesn’t intend to run for executive next fall — that’s the appropriate emphasis, said Commissioner Dan McCarthy. A Democrat, McCarthy also applied to be county executive. Until recently, you couldn’t tell a Democrat from a Republican on the Lehigh County board. Traditionally, county government is more about efficiently delivering services than partisan absolutism. As McCarthy points out, there’s really no Democratic or Republican way to run a prison or a coroner’s office. But Cunningham, a Democrat, said the fall election ushered in a board he described as the most politicized of his tenure. This board has butted heads with the administration over pass-through grants, bridges, staffing contracts and the reassessment. Hansell will take office in that context of conflict. That may assist him in brokering deals with the Republican commissioners and won’t elicit the same automatic responses from the Republicans that a more partisan Democrat might. There’s also a certain amount of loss in that, as a Democratic voice is muted. But if taken like a scoreboard, Democrats aren’t really handing it over to the Republicans, because Cunningham wasn’t winning many either. Commissioners rejected the pass-through grants, haven’t agreed to fix the Reading Road Bridge in Allentown, turned down the staffing agreements and overruled him on the reassessment. Hansell will present the budget his first day in office, but he said it’s a spending plan he can support. He said it doesn’t include a tax increase. Despite an expected push from the conservative slate to roll back taxes, Hansell said he stands by the 16 percent tax hike. That support, he said, is based on his belief that the tax rate could stand for several years and would give taxpayers some stability. If the board wants to make more sweeping changes to the budget, Hansell hopes they’ll wait till next year when he and freshmen members are more versed in the budget and have a chance to implement changes to the budget format. Hansell will introduce new performance measurement standards and at the board’s behest pursue a new system of priority-based budgeting, which could require county departments to rank their programs by singling out the 20 percent they consider of least priority. Mazziotti said a candidate’s willingness to explore priority-based budgeting was a factor in his choice for executive. After the vote, he said the board was hiring someone to manage the county, and Hansell is “head and shoulders” the most qualified. And if there are disagreements, he added, the Republican supermajority can overcome any divide.

Henderson, Nevada (population 257,729): When he was the general manager of the Regional Transportation Commission of Southern Nevada, people could sometimes find Jacob Snow riding on buses to experience the public transit system firsthand, according to the Las Vegas Review-Journal. With his new position as Henderson city manager, his experiences as a Henderson resident will influence his leadership in the city and vice versa. Instead of bus rides, Snow might be found frequenting the recreation centers or even plopping down in an employee’s cubicle to get to know him – if he isn’t busy signing paperwork or attending meeting after meeting. As the city manager, Snow is responsible for directing city policy and strategic planning and overseeing all the departments and divisions. Snow’s story with Henderson didn’t begin in April with his appointment but with his parents in the early ’50s. Henderson had just been incorporated and didn’t have much of an appeal to the family, Snow said. Instead, they settled in Boulder City. Henderson was often the topic of discussion at the dinner table growing up, he said. After college, he and his wife moved back to Boulder City. Snow said his wife liked the way Henderson was developing and wanted to be part of the community. After high school, Snow went to Brigham Young University. Snow fell in love with the subject and pursued a bachelor’s degree. He went on to get his master’s in geography with an emphasis in urban planning. Snow started at the Clark County Department of Aviation, where he worked for 10 years. By the time he left, he was the assistant director and oversaw McCarran International Airport, the Henderson Executive Airport and the North Las Vegas Airport. Snow landed at the Regional Transportation Commission in 1999. He went on to help with projects such as the Las Vegas Beltway. Of all the projects Snow takes pride in, his favorite is the Henderson Spaghetti Bowl, which is the intersection between U.S. Highway 95 and the Las Vegas Beltway. Since his time at the Clark County Department of Aviation, Snow’s wife would point out how great it would be if he worked for the city of Henderson. After former city manager Mark Calhoun announced his retirement, Snow submitted his resume. He was hired in April. City Council members have said that Snow’s hiring has created a dream team of the city staff. Many of the council members knew and worked with Snow when he was with the transportation commission. Councilwoman Debra March began working with Snow when she was the vice chair for the Urban Land Institute. Snow was on the board. After she was appointed to the City Council, March joined the transportation commission board and continued to work alongside Snow. March added that Snow’s background will help the city continue finding creative solutions to problems. Adding to the pressure of a new job, Snow was tasked with finding a new chief of police after former chief Jutta Chambers retired. March was impressed by Snow’s ability to jump in. His search led to the recommendation of Patrick Moers, who was sworn in in July. A few months into the job, Snow said he is still learning. Snow believes the city is primed to emerge from rough economic times and begin redeveloping. As his wife originally suggested, Snow does ride his bicycle to work. And on occasion, he will even get back on a bus to take a ride.

Blount County, Alabama (population 57,322): The Blount County Commission voted 3 to 1 Tuesday morning to terminate Ralph Mitchell from the position of county administrator, following a 65-minute executive session, according to The Blount Countian. A hearing date of Sept. 6 was set in compliance with the employee manual to allow Mitchell to defend himself from charges or allegations.

Northglenn, Colorado (population 35,789): After four years with the city of Northglenn, city manager Bill Simmons is retiring, according to Our Colorado News. City Council unanimously approved by an 8-0 vote a retirement agreement for Simmons during its regularly scheduled meeting Aug. 13. Ward III Councilwoman Susan Clyne was absent. Simmon’s retirement is effective Dec. 31. He was hired by the city in November 2008. No council member commented on the retirement plans during the meeting. Simmons, however, thanked council for approving the agreement. Simmons will receive severance payments through May 3, 2013, totaling $57,000. He will also receive a lump-sum payment for any unused and accrued vacation time up to Dec. 31. As part of the agreement, Simmons will be available through May 3, 2013, to assist with any issues related to the transition of a new city manager. Mayor Joyce Downing said council wasn’t expecting the retirement. Simmons filled the vacancy left when former City Manager A.J. Krieger resigned. Krieger, who was hired in October 2006, left the city in May 2008.

Churchill County, Nevada (population 24,877): When it came to being selected Churchill County manager, the second time indeed did prove to be a charm for Eleanor Lockwood, according to the Lahontan Valley News. Lockwood’s 15 years of service in the Churchill County Planning Department was the deciding factor Monday morning when county commissioners selected her as the new county manager. Lockwood, who has been planning director since 2000, was bypassed when she applied for the county manager’s position in 2004. This time, she got the nod by a 3-0 vote in a decision over two other finalists, Dan Holler and Michael McMahon. Lockwood is due to take over in her new role on Sept. 4. She replaces Brad Goetsch, who resigned on May 3.

South Lake Tahoe, California (population 21,403):  At the conclusion of Tuesday’s City Council closed session, the council unanimously voted and offered the full time permanent City Manager position to Nancy Kerry, according to KRNV. The terms of the two-and-a-half year contract are still being negotiated. Ms. Kerry has been with the City of South Lake Tahoe since 2008 working in various departments. She worked alongside the previous City Manager to develop a comprehensive Strategic Plan with meaningful performance measures later operationalized into an effective City Business Plan linking priorities to measurable outcomes throughout the organization. Ms. Kerry has 12 years in government and more than 15 years in private business started in Southern California. Prior to moving to Tahoe, she worked for the City of Solana Beach, San Diego County, San Diego Association of Governments and San Diego District Attorney’s Office. Ms. Kerry also has a background in the private sector as Vice President of her father’s manufacturing company for many years and providing private consulting services to organizations. Ms. Kerry earned her Bachelor’s Degree from San Diego State University where her GPA garnered a rare Summa Cum Laude with distinction award. She continued her education by earning a Master of Public Administration degree, also from SDSU, where her grades and participation were recognized when she was named the Outstanding Graduate Student of 2001 by the School of Public Administration.

Artesia, California (population 16,522): After serving the City of Artesia for more than 18 years, City Manager Maria Dadian says she plans to retire and will step down from her post in late October, according to the Cerritos-ArtesiaPatch. When asked about her decision, Dadian said it was simply the right time. Dadian, a California State Los Angeles graduate, has served the city since January 1994, when she was hired as the Assistant City Manager. She was appointed to City Manager in 2000, and has been the driving force, alongside the City Council, behind many of Artesia’s projects, including the redevelopment projects and other city improvement projects. Mayor John P. Lyon, who has worked with Dadian for most of her tenure, said her service to the community has been commendable and that Artesia won’t be the same without her. Prior to her work with the City of Artesia, Dadian began her career in municipal government working for the City of South El Monte in 1975. In March 1982, she accepted the position of Parks and Recreation Director with the City of Hawaiian Gardens, and after four years was promoted to Assistant to the City Administrator. After 11 years of continuous service with the city, she was named interim Executive Director of Hawaiian Gardens’ newly established non-profit organization called the Coalition for Youth Development. During her municipal career she has been contracted by both public entities and private businesses to organize and implement public safety and recreation programs. Dadian has not yet revealed what she plans to do after retirement. Her last day as City Manager is slated for Oct. 19. The City of Artesia will be entering into a transitional period, and during this time the City Council plans to provide considerations to selecting a new city manager. The City Council will convene on Monday, Aug. 27 to commence this work, according to the city.

Longmeadow, Massachusetts (population 15,784): The Select Board has chosen Bonnie L. Therrien to serve as Longmeadow’s new town manager, according to The Republican. The town is currently in negotiations with Therrien, who interviewed for the position on Aug. 15 and was one of five finalists. The board voted unanimously on Aug. 17 to select Therrien, the interim town manager in North Branford, Conn. During her interview Therrien described her management style as open, fair and objective. Therrien has more than 25 years of experience working with municipal government. She is the former town manager of Hebron and Wethersfield, Conn., served as the deputy city manager for Hartford, Conn., and most recently in North Branford. Therrien has a master’s degree in public administration and criminal justice from American International College. Asked about her communications plan for her staff and the public, Therrien said she meets with department heads twice a month and strongly believes in public forums and hearings to keep the public informed. Therrien said every year before residents vote on the budget she asks to be invited to their homes, where she meets with groups of 15 to 20 people and answers any questions they might have about the budget process. During the interviews the board said it would offer the candidate a salary between $105,000 and $115,00, a reduction from the original $115,000 to $135,000 range. This is the second attempt to hire a town manager in the past month. The town originally entered into contract negotiations with Thomas Guerino, the town administrator in Bourne, but they could not come to an agreement on the contract. Therrien was selected from an original list of 33 applicants narrowed down by the Collins Center for Public Management.

Reedsburg, Wisconsin (population 10,014): For those who haven’t met new Reedsburg city administrator Ken Witt, Thursday night is a good chance to do so, according to the Reedsburg Times-Press. As part of the Reedsburg Area Chamber of Commerce Business After Five program, a meet-and-greet gathering is scheduled for 5 to 7 p.m. Thursday at the Common Council chambers, 134 Locust St. Hors d’oeuvres will be served. Witt was hired in June and started working July 23. City officials said at the time he was hired for his budgeting expertise and ability to work well with department heads and personnel, as well as a history in aiding economic development. Witt comes from Sparta, where he was city manager for eight years.
Southborough, Massachusetts (population 9,767): At a meeting early on the morning of August 22, the Board of Selectmen voted unanimously to offer the job of Southborough town administrator to Mark Purple, current interim town administrator in Ashland, according to mysouthborough.com. For all three selectmen the right choice was Purple. Chairman John Rooney pointed to Purple’s experience in municipal administration as being key to his decision. Purple has been the assistant town administrator in Ashland since 2006. Prior that he was an assistant town manager in Framingham. Rooney also commended Purple’s leadership style. Calling him “very impressive,” Selectman Dan Kolenda said Southborough could benefit from Purple’s experience implementing costs savings in the communities in which he has served. He also said he was swayed by the fact that Purple began his early career working as a truck driver and laborer. While they were unanimous in their top pick, selectmen said all three finalists for the position were well qualified. Purple, along with fellow finalists West Boylston Town Administrator Leon Gaumond Jr. and Lincoln Assistant Town Administrator Anita Scheipers, was interviewed by the board on Monday night. Rooney said hiring a strong town administrator like Purple will allow the Board of Selectmen to focus on “bigger issues and community goals,” instead of being mired in the day-to-day operations of the town. The Board authorized Rooney to begin negotiations with Purple on a contract immediately.

Warren, Maine (population 8,589): Longtime Town Manager Grant Watmough will be stepping down as town manager after nearly 17 years, according to the Bangor Daily News. Watmough turned in his letter of resignation to selectmen at their Wednesday night meeting. He will continue on through Nov. 26. He declined to comment on his reasons for retiring this year beyond what was stated in the letter. Watmough has been town manager since January 1996, succeeding Christine Savage. He served four additional years previously as the town’s code enforcement officer. Doug Pope, chairman of the Board of Selectmen, said Watmough’s announcement will accelerate the search for a new manager. He said Watmough had planned on retiring next summer but decided he would begin retirement earlier. Watmough was reappointed to his post in April for another year, but by a close vote by selectmen. The vote was 3-2 with the two members opposed to his reappointment saying in April that the town needed to go in a new direction and that some long-term problems have not been addressed. The majority of selectmen, however, voiced support for Watmough and cited his service to the community. Pope said selectmen are considering hiring a company that specializes in recruitment of municipal managers. Watmough also is serving as code enforcement officer following the resignation of the code officer earlier this year.

Aransas Pass, Texas (population 8,204): The city council accepted City Manager Reggie Winters resignation during executive session, according to The Aransas Pass Progress. Winters submitted his letter of resignation last Friday and the affectivity [sic] is immediate. In accordance with his contract, Winters will continue to be paid through September 19, 2012. According to City Secretary Yvonne Stonebraker, an interim city manager is expected to be named next week.

Aberdeen, Mississippi (population 5,612): Greenwood Springs resident Michael P. King has been named the new Monroe County administrator, according to the Monroe Journal.
King ran his own business as a residential contractor for eight years. Before that he was an industrial engineer with Glenn Enterprises. King has a degree from Mississippi State in industrial technology. He lives in Greenwood Springs with his wife and two sons.

Russell, Kansas (population 4,506): At Tuesday’s Russell City Council meeting, City Manager Ralph Wise announced his resignation from the office effective October 1, 2012, according to KRSL. Wise will continue his current duties until that date, and official word has not been given on an interim or permanent replacement.

Soldotna, Alaska (population (4,163): The council offered Mark Dixson, of Soldotna, a position as city manager, added the city manager’s position back into the state’s Public Employee’s Retirements System (PERS), according to the Peninsula Clarion. Larry Semmens, current city manager, said there was about a week of overlap planned between his exit and Dixson’s entrance Oct. 1 but that he planned to leave the city ahead of his Oct. 31 final date. Semmens, who technically retired last year, continued to work for the city after the council decided to cut the position of city manager from the PERS system and hire him as a contract employee. At the time, Semmens said the move saved the city money as it was no longer liable for his family’s medical costs, just his. Dixson, however, wanted to earn PERS credit, so the council agreed to put the position back into the system in a move Semmens said would again save the city money. When the position is out of PERS, Semmens said the city still pays 24.16 percent of the city manager’s salary into the system in what’s known as unfunded liability, essentially back payments into the system as it is currently underfunded. When Dixson starts, the city’s share will be reduced to 22% of his salary, he said. Dixson’s starting salary will be $120,000 a year and it will go up in $5,000 increments for the next two years. At that time it will then be determined by the council as part of its annual budget process, according to city’s employment offer.

Hiram, Georgia (population 3,546): Hiram City Council approved the hiring of Robbie Rokovitz as city manager at a special called meeting earlier this week, according to Neighborhood Newspapers. Rokovitz was chosen from six candidates, whose names were announced by the council earlier this month. Rokovitz comes from the city of Cedartown, where he served as city manager. The vote was unanimous, and Mayor Doris Devey said she thought Rokovitz would “bring a lot to the city of Hiram.” Rokovitz has accepted the position and will be sworn in as city manager Sept. 4, according to Devey. The city manager started his career in Alpharetta, where he served as a police officer. He has also worked at Lanier Technical College, where he taught criminal justice classes, served as a financial manager with Gwinnett County, was city manager for the city of Holly Springs and also served as assistant city administrator at the city of Alpharetta before working in Cedartown. Rokovitz will replace interim City Manager Billy Beckett, who has worked at the city of Hiram since early June.

Overton, Texas (population 2,554): Overton City Council, in a special meeting Thursday with Mayor John Welch, chose its former city manager Joe Cantu to return to the post, according to the Kilgore News Herald. In a telephone exchange with Acting City Manager Deana McCasland, Friday morning, Cantu stated he would accept the job. Assembled at City Hall, Welch and Councilmen Pat Beets, Philip Cox, C. R. Evans Jr. and John Posey went into executive session for about 15 minutes, returned to the meeting chamber and Welch nominated Cantu for city manager. Cox motioned for approval of Cantu and Evans seconded. All four members next voted in favor. Councilman Jimmy Jennings was absent. The other witnesses were McCasland, as city secretary, and Police Chief Clyde Carter. Cantu was Overton city manager for less than two years in the mid-1990s. He was also CM at Shenandoah, Peñitas and Elsa – all in Texas. Originally from McAllen, he studied at University of Texas Pan-American in Edinburg. Cantu has 43 years in law enforcement is now a patrol officer for the La Joya Police Department. He is married and has two grown daughters.

Hampton Falls, New Hampshire (population 2,236): Town Administrator Eric N. Small is retiring from the town of Hampton Falls, according to SeaCoastOnline. The public is invited to join the Board of Selectmen and town employees at the Hampton Falls Town Hall, 1 Drinkwater Road, for an open house Tuesday, Aug. 28, from 1 to 5:30 p.m., to thank Small for his service to the town of Hampton Falls over the past 26 years. Small, a Seabrook resident, will retire effective Aug. 31. .

Swansboro, North Carolina (population 1,902): The new manager for the Town of Swansboro is new to town but not to the area, according to The Jacksonville Daily News. David Harvell, who is currently serving as assistant city manager in Havelock, has been named Swansboro’s new manager by a unanimous vote of the Board of Commissioners. The Board of Commissioners voted to hire Harvell Tuesday night, concluding a five-month search to fill the position vacated in March by former Manager Pat Thomas, who took a job as city manager in Southport. Retired local government manager Tommy Combs has served as interim manager for the town and guided the town board in its search for a replacement manager. Mayor Scott Chadwick said the process was a thorough one as the board reviewed all 98 applicants, narrowed the field to 30 or so and then reviewed them further to get down to the 10 finalists they interviewed. Chadwick thanked Combs and Town Clerk Paula Webb for the work they put into assisting with the process and commended commissioners for their commitment to the process. Chadwick said Harvell stood out among a strong field of candidates and described Harvell as “very personable and professional” and able to make a quick transition to his new duties thanks to his familiarity with the area and the town. His experience also includes time as town manager in Atlantic Beach. He resides in Carteret County in nearby Pine Knoll Shores. Harvell said he’ll bring with him a knowledge of the area and the region and his first task will be to get to know the community at the local level. And he’s impressed with what he already knows about the small seaport town and its history. Harvell is to begin work on or before Sept. 17. He will receive an annual salary of $78,000, as well as a monthly allowance of $100 for cell phone and $450 for vehicle. Commissioner Junior Freeman said that from their review of the applications, Harvell has the experience and background the town is looking for. Harvell’s experience in Eastern North Carolina impressed Commissioner Jim Allen. While several of the commissioners took part in the previous manager search, it was a new experience for the others. Philpott said there was also full participation of the board, with every commissioner having the opportunity to review all the applications. Commissioner Gery Boucher said that in his previous job as dean of Craven Community College’s Havelock campus he got to observe Harvell’s ability to communicate with a diverse population of people. And during the interview process, Harvell showed he had gotten to know the town.

New Buffalo, Michigan (population 1,883): Mayor Rusty Geisler’s days on New Buffalo’s City Council may be numbered, but only because he’s been offered the job of City Manager, according to The Harbor County News. It happened during the regular monthly Council meeting on Tuesday, Aug. 21, during a discussion of what course of action to take following the unexpected resignation of City Manager Mike Mitchell on Aug. 10. Council member Warren Peterson started the discussion by stating that it was important to replace Mitchell as soon as possible. He also noted that one of the problems that has plagued past city managers in the current economy is the difficulty they have relocating here. Often, they have a hard time selling the homes they are living in when they are offered (and accept) the job here, he said. Council member Susan Maroko suggested taking advantage of the resources available through the Michigan Municipal League, which offers free assistance finding both interim and permanent employees for positions in city government. That’s when Council member Ray Lawson spoke up to suggest what he thought was a better idea: Offer the job to Mayor Geisler. Council member Migs Murray concurred, and after reminding all present that Geisler grew up in the city, knows just about everything there is to know about the city and on that basis alone is the likely best choice for the city, it was she who made the motion to do precisely that. The offer was contingent upon Geisler’s acceptance of a “letter of understanding” (essentially, the terms of his employment), which had yet to be written, as well as his resignation from the City Council if he should accept the city manager’s position. During continuing discussions preceding the vote, Maroko said she had “no problem” with Geisler serving as interim city manager, but it was her opinion that the city’s residents deserve what she called “a professional search” for a qualified replacement. Maroko also pointed out that, just as Assistant to the City Manager Ryan Fellows had previously been disqualified from seeking the city manager’s job because he didn’t have a masters degree, Mayor Geisler doesn’t meet all of the qualifications either. That didn’t matter a whit to Lawson, who ventured that Geisler “is probably a better choice than all the past city managers we’ve had.” When it came to a vote, the motion passed 3 to 1, with Maroko voting no and Geisler abstaining after recusing himself from the entire discussion. Acting in her role as mayor pro tem, Murray proposed holding a special meeting as soon as possible to prepare the letter of understanding. The meeting was scheduled for 9 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 25, at City Hall. As advised by City Attorney Harold Schuitmaker, Geisler stated for the record that, if he finds the terms of the letter of understanding to be acceptable, he will promptly submit his resignation from the council. After the meeting, Geisler said he had no idea that he was going to be offered the city manager’s position, and he expressed gratitude for the votes of confidence that his colleagues delivered on his behalf.

Transitions: Henry County, VA; Little Elm, TX; Mitchell County, GA and more

Benny Summerlin
1958-2012

Henry County, Virginia (population 54,151): The Henry County Board of Supervisors on Monday named Tim Hall county administrator in a unanimous vote, according to the Martinsville Bulletin. Hall, 52, who had been deputy county administrator, also was named the new general manager of the Henry County Public Service Authority (PSA). He will earn $126,184.79 for the dual roles that became vacant when Benny Summerlin, 53, of Axton, died Wednesday. Debra Buchanan, of the Horsepasture District, made the motion to appoint him to the post. H.G. Vaughn of the Ridgeway District seconded the motion, and the final vote followed an estimated 45-minute closed session meeting to fill the post. Jim Adams, chairman of the supervisors, said the board had other options, including appointing an interim administrator. The PSA Board of Directors also met Monday and took similar action. Hall was named deputy county administrator and also assistant general manager of the PSA in 2002, the same year Summerlin was appointed county administrator and general manager. Adams said only the administrator and county attorney report directly to the supervisors and noted that those are the only positions the supervisors fill. However, he said the vacant positions Hall previously held will first be posted internally to determine whether there are any interested and qualified applicants. Hall will make that determination and fill the two vacant posts, Adams said. Hall, who also served as the county’s public information officer, had served in a number of capacities in the Henry County school division, including teacher/coach and public information officer. He became news director at WMVA Radio in 1990, after leaving his nearly 10-year job as a writer/reporter and columnist for the Lynchburg News & Advance. Hall earned his MBA from Averett University in 2007; was a 1981 graduate of James Madison University and also a 1977 graduate of Martinsville High School. Hall and his family live in Collinsville.

Little Elm, Texas (population 25,898): The Town of Little Elm has selected Matt Mueller as the new town manager, according to the Little Elm Journal Star. Mueller, who has served as the city manager of Guthrie, Okla., will begin his service with Little Elm on Sept. 17 after he completes his current city’s budget. Little Elm Interim Town Manager Doug Peach described Mueller as very personable who will “only go to improve our current level of customer service.” When Mueller arrives, the town will introduce him to Little Elm ISD administration and principals and city officials in neighboring cities and within Denton County. Little Elm has been without a town manager for the last seven months. Peach, who served as the assistant town manager before the town manager’s resignation, has stepped up during that time to act as interim until the town could find a new one through a search firm. Mueller will be coming from Guthrie, a city that also has a lake and similar challenges that Little Elm has, Hillock said. The town’s emphasis has been on making customer service a priority and improving it. Mueller has also served as deputy city manager for Claremore, Okla., and the management analyst for Edmond, Okla. He currently serves as a board member for the City Management Association of Oklahoma. Mueller received his bachelor’s degree in Political Science from the University of Central Oklahoma. While there, he was the president of the Pi Sigma Alpha Political Science Honor Society and was awarded the political science department’s student leadership award. He received his Master of Public Administration from the University of Oklahoma. Some of Mueller’s major accomplishments have included completing a new water treatment plant in Guthrie that will serve the city for the next 40-50 years. He has also aided in providing for infrastructure needs and long-term financial needs. Mueller discovered Little Elm’s search for a new town manager through the town’s search firm’s website and through his fellow colleague, the city manager in The Colony. Mueller said he has networked with several city managers in the area, describing the Dallas Metroplex as having “really innovative governments.” Mueller described the town council as a pro-growth group that has a great vision for the community. Little Elm’s growth is very intriguing and comes with both a tremendous amount of opportunities and challenges, he continued. When he arrives in September, Mueller plans to learn and absorb the first couple of months to really get a feel for Little Elm. He expects local government to be as efficient and productive as possible. Mueller has been married to his wife Rachel for almost 10 years. They are expecting their first child early next year. The Town of Little Elm will host a public meet and greet when Mueller arrives to introduce him to the community. The date is to be determined.

Mitchell County, Georgia (population 23,498): The Mitchell County Commission has voted to dismiss its county administrator, according to the Albany Herald. In a 3-1 vote, with one commissioner absent, the commission decided Tuesday to terminate Administrator Jerry Presley, citing a clause in his contract that allowed for the dismissal, Mitchell County Clerk’s office officials say. Commission Chairman Benjamin Hayward of District 1 was the sole commissioner to vote against termination. Attempts to reach Hayward on Thursday were unsuccessful. The Albany Herald, however, did obtain a copy of the handwritten dismissal letter sent to Presley that was signed by Hayward.

“Please allow this to serve as written notice of the termination of your employment contract with the Mitchell County pursuant to paragraph 12(a) of said contract,” the letter states. “The Board of Commissioners understands that you are entitled to three months of your annual salary together with other compensation provided in paragraph 12(b) of said contract. The board of commissioners believes that you are not a good match for Mitchell County.”

The paragraphs mentioned in the letter refer to the termination clause of Presley’s contract that states that either party can terminate the contract for any reason given at least 30 days of notice. Paragraph B states that if the contract is terminated but Presley is still able to perform the duties at the time of termination, that the county should pay him three months of severance and reward him with any leave or sick time he’s accrued. Following the vote, the commission voted 4-0 to reinstate Jerry Perminter as the county’s interim administrator until a full-time replacement can be found. The decision to dismiss Presley comes less that five months after commissioners voted to offer him the job on April 25 and less than three months after he accepted on June 4.

Wilmington, Massachusetts (population 22,325): The process of finding the replacement for retiring Town Manager Michael Caira was a smooth one, according to the WilmingtonPatch. So it comes as little surprise that the ensuing contract negotiations have been met with a similar result. According to both sides of the negotiations, a contract for Jeff Hull is likely to be finalized in September, and could be announced during the next Board of Selectmen meeting, which is slated for Monday, September 10. Negotiations have been taking place throughout the summer, and continued as recently as Monday during executive session of the Board of Selectmen meeting. Board of Selectmen chairman Mike Newhouse said he, like Hull, anticipates that there will be another executive session at the September 10 meeting, and a contract could be voted on that night by board members. Newhouse said it’s likely the executive session could take place before the regular agenda so that when open session begins, the contract could be finalized. Caira’s official last day is slated for September 30, and Hull’s contract will likely go into effect on October 1 when it is finalized. Though this will be Hull’s first Town Manager position, he has served as Wilmington’s Assistant Town Manager for several decades. Hull said he knows replacing the longest tenured Town Manager in Wilmington history will be no easy task, but it is a job he looks forward to.

Snellville, Georgia (population 18,242): Snellville officials have hired a new city manager to take the city helm, according to the Gwinnett Daily Post. Mayor Kelly Kautz announed the appointment of James C. (Butch) Sanders Thursday, a day after the city council voted after meeting in executive session. Slated to start on Monday, Sanders replaces Russell Treadway, who left the city earlier this year to return to his Tennessee home. Police Chief Roy Whitehead has served as interim city manager since May. Sanders, who has 25 years of experience in municipal work, resigned in February as Henry County’s manager. He has also worked for the city of McDonough and spent nearly 20 years with the city of Dalton. The Florida native received a bachelor’s degree and master’s of public administration from the University of Georgia. He and his wife Jennifer have two children. Terms of Sander’s contract have not been set.

Jasper County, Georgia (population 13,900): The Jasper County Commission voted unanimously August 14 to immediately terminate County Manager Greg Wood under terms of his contract, citing section 9.06, according to The Monticello News. The action came after a closed session lasting nearly an hour, and was applauded by many in the audience. The commissioners then agreed for Assistant County Manager/Chief Financial Officer Lorri Smith to serve as interim county manager. They also agreed to compensate Mrs. Smith $10,000 annually for the additional duties.

Washington, Iowa (population 7,266): The Riverside City Council has hired Russell “Rusty” Rogerson as its new city administrator/clerk, according to The Journal. The council voted to hire him at a special council meeting Wednesday afternoon, and less than 24 hours later Rogerson was hard at work in city hall.

Seat Pleasant, Maryland (population 4,542): After a two-year search to find its top administrative official, Seat Pleasant is once again in the market for a new city administrator, according to The Gazette. Vincent Jones announced his resignation effective Aug. 24 on Monday. He said he is departing to be the new deputy chief of staff for Richmond’s City Council. The Richmond, Va., area native served as Seat Pleasant’s city administrator since June 2011, becoming the first permanent replacement in the position since 2008. The City Council will discuss how to move forward in a closed session Monday, said Mayor Eugene Grant. Prior to Jones, the city’s last permanent city administrator was Sandra Yates who was fired in 2008 shortly after the September 2008 election. Of Yates’ exit, Grant said that personnel changes were common with new administrations coming in. Alex Rodriguez served as acting city manager during the search for a long-term replacement from December 2008 to April 2009. After Rodriguez and the city parted ways for reasons undisclosed because of a personnel issue, city treasurer Robert Ashton served as an acting city manager until Jones was hired in June 2011. Grant said he knows it will be a challenge to attract a permanent replacement because he wants a salary more competitive than the $80,000 annual one the city provides. However, with projects such as the $30 million to $50 million City Center project that includes a new City Hall and housing for seniors, he is confident the city will find a replacement that will move the city forward through its revitalization. Jones said he is proud of being able to update the city’s personnel manual and help the city develop a strategic plan that includes the city’s vision for future economic development and expanding public safety. Jones said he will miss the close working relationship he had with the Seat Pleasant city staff the most. Councilwoman Elenora Simms (Ward 1) said she wants the City Council to look through the candidates they considered when they hired Jones.

New Castle, Colorado (population 4,158): Tom Baker, former town manager for Carbondale and Basalt, has been offered the chance to do the same job for the town of New Castle, according to the Post Independent. According to a proposed “employment agreement” that will be considered by the Town Council tonight, Baker is being offered the job of town administrator, at $88,000 a year, plus benefits. The agreement, attached to the Town Council agenda for tonight’s meeting, did not indicate when Baker is expected to start work. Baker replaces former administrator Andy Barton, who left in May to take a job as town manager in Mesquite, Ariz. At the time he left, Barton was being paid $96,700 a year. The council offered the job to Baker after also considering former Snowmass Village assistant town manager Leslie Klusmire, former Venice, Fla., city manager Martin Black, and Monte Vista town manager Don Van Wormer. In addition to his salary, Baker will receive certain benefits, including use of a town-owned car for official purposes, and for commuting to and from work. Baker, who currently lives in Carbondale, also will be required to move to the New Castle area within a year, under the provisions of the proposed contract. The town has agreed to pay up to $3,500 in relocation expenses to make the move, and the contract states that “failure to do so [move] shall automatically terminate this agreement” unless Baker and the town agree to extend the deadline. Baker has logged considerable governmental work experience in Western Slope communities, having worked as a planner, assistant city manager and director of affordable housing in Aspen and Pitkin County prior to his jobs in Basalt and Carbondale. He also has run his own consulting firm, Baker and Associates, since 1994.

Fort Yukon, Alaska (population 583): Dave Richards, the former Pahrump town manager, has moved back to Alaska to take a position as city manager of Fort Yukon, a tiny community more than 100 miles northeast of Fairbanks, according to the Pahrump Valley Times. Richards was Pahrump town manager from January 2004 to February 2008 and left to become manager of Hoonah, Alaska, a community of 900 people just outside Juneau in southeastern Alaska. Richards left Hoonah in 2011 and came back to southern Nevada to live in Las Vegas. For the past year, he was seen at numerous political events in Pahrump and admitted he was looking for a job locally. Richards was appointed to the Pahrump Regional Planning Commission June 5 but was gone by this Wednesday’s meeting in which the board rejected a request for a conditional use permit by exotic animal owner Karl Mitchell. Richards was actively involved in the discussion on the Symphony Animal Foundation request at the July 11 RPC meeting. Richards said his two-year stint in Hoonah was in coastal Alaska; his new job in the interior will be quite different.

Transitions: San Diego County, CA; Henrico County, VA; Greenville, NC and more

Picture of Walt Ekard

Walt Ekard

San Diego County, California (population 1,301,617): The longtime chief administrative officer for San Diego County announced Wednesday that he will step down on Dec. 1. Walt Ekard made the announcement during the afternoon session of the Board of Supervisors meeting. Ekard said he is not retiring, but will seek other challenges. He has led the county government since 1999, making him the longest-serving person in the position in modern times. Board Chairman Ron Roberts said Ekard helped make the county one of the best managed local governments in the country. Ekard, whose wife and three daughters were in attendance, said he was privileged to have led the county staff. The chief administrative officer oversees 40 departments, manages around 15,000 employees and implements directives by the supervisors. No successor was immediately announced, but the board was expected to go into closed session later Wednesday to discuss how to proceed.

Henrico County, Virginia (population 306,935): At a Board of Supervisors meeting Tuesday evening, John Vithoulkas was appointed as the new county manager of Henrico County, according to WRIC. Vithoulkas, who has been an employee of Henrico County since 1997, will succeed Virgil R. Hazelett, who served in the county manager position for 20 years. Vithoulkas will begin his term in January 2013. The Henrico County Board of Supervisors unanimously voted Vithoulkas into the position, and explain what it entails: “As county manager, Vithoulkas will serve as Henrico’s chief administrative officer, responsible for implementing policies established by the Board of Supervisors and for overseeing the daily operations of the county and more than 35 agencies with approximately 4,000 general government employees. Duties include preparation and oversight of the county’s annual budget, which tops $1 billion in operating and capital expenditures for the 2012-13 fiscal year, and preparation of the county’s annual legislative program before the Virginia General Assembly.” Vithoulkas has served in several positions during his tenure at Henrico County, including budget analyst, Acting Director of Finance, deputy county manager, and special economic advisor. Vithoulkas’ contributions to Henrico County are numerous: during the recession, Vithoulkas introduced policies which allowed the county to balance its budget, even while absorbing revenue declines of more than $92 million. He also lead an effort which established Henrico, VA as an official mailing address with the U.S. Postal Service, garnering $5 million annually in tax revenues previously misdirected to other localities. Vithoulkas is a native of Greece, and immigrated to Virginia as an infant. He was educated in Henrico County Public Schools, and earned a bachelor’s degree in political science from Virginia Commonwealth University in 1989. He also received a master’s degree in public administration from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte in 1992. He is a member of numerous organizations within the metro Richmond area, including Virginia Local Government Manager’s Association and the Richmond Association of Business Economists.

Greenville, North Carolina (population 84,554): For the first time since the resignation of Wayne Bowers left Greenville without a city manager, that critical post will again be filled as Barbara Lipscomb begins work, according to The Reflector. The new city manager comes to this community with a host of experience in several cities, strong recommendations and the unanimous approval of a rarely united City Council. This is a unique community, one anchored by a large state university, a tremendous health care infrastructure and a population eager for Greenville to fulfill its tremendous opportunity for growth and commerce. However, some persistent ills — among them crime, planning and a need for more diverse economic development options — continue to hold it back and demand Lipscomb’s concerted attention in her new post. It came as a surprise to many observers when Bowers used the occasion of the City Council’s annual planning retreat to announce his intention to resign, effective at the end of February. Though he had submitted retirement papers six months prior, the former manager’s decision became public only one week after the departure for Greenville Police Chief William Anderson. That change at the top promised a significant shift in the identities of those holding key posts in city leadership. But, if handled correctly, that potential crisis could instead represent a tremendous opportunity for Greenville to inject new ideas and fresh perspective into the process that guides decision making. The City Council moved swiftly to identify a new manager and ultimately selected Lipscomb, the former manager of Casselberry, Fla., to lead city staff. Her management experience in several Florida cities coupled with a University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill education won her unanimous support from an oft-divided council. For Greenville, so lengthy a resume must translate into action quickly if Lipscomb’s term is to be judged a success. Despite its many positive attributes, the city still has its faults, and many will be accentuated by the return of East Carolina University’s student population. The new manager will need to hire a police chief and improve public safety. Growth and planning issues are a constant concern and problems are poised to worsen with the council’s recent decision to allow greater population density in already crowded neighborhoods. And other worries — parks and recreation, traffic, infrastrucutre, etc. — will command attention as well. Libscomb has a tall order ahead, but she inherits a city eager to fill its expectations. She should be welcomed with best wishes for luck in her new job.

Bryan, Texas (population 76,201): After more than a year of holding the job in the interim, Kean Register has been named city manager of Bryan, according to The Bryan College Station Eagle. The unanimous decision was made at Tuesday’s meeting of the Bryan City Council. Register was appointed interim city manager in 2010, following the resignation of David Watkins. At the time he was hired, the council said it was choosing him because he didn’t want the permanent job. Register has spent most of his career in electric utilities and indicated that he wanted to return to that job soon. Prior to his appointment as interim city manager, he was a group manager at Bryan Texas Utilities. He said he hoped to eventually be the general manager of BTU, which is owned by the city. But now, he is the general manager’s boss. During Register’s tenure as interim city manager, the city took a larger role in the oversight of BTU and clarified that the general manager reports to the city manager. Meanwhile, Register worked to make cuts in staffing and expenditures during difficult economic times. Last year, his staff reduced $2.1 million from its general operations. Much of that came from 20 job cuts, including the outsourcing of some janitorial and landscaping work. As Register’s tenure lengthened, council members began saying that they would like him to make the job permanent. Eventually, Register agreed. Register said he initially wasn’t interested in the job because of the quick turnover at the city manager position. In his 11 years at the city, four people have held the job, he said. But he has grown accustomed to the staff and enjoyed working with the council, he said, so he changed his mind. Salary information for Register wasn’t immediately available Tuesday night.

Morgan Hill, California (population 37,882): Morgan Hill city manager Ed Tewes announced to City Hall employees Monday that he will resign as of Dec. 28, according to the Morgan Hill Times. Tewes, 61, has been the city manager of Morgan Hill for 13 years. He sent a private letter to the five City Council members Friday notifying them of his intent to resign, and made the decision public Monday with an e-mail to all city employees.

Belmont, Massachusetts (population 24,729): After 10 months of searching, the Belmont Board of Selectmen approved an employment contract with David Kale to become Belmont’s Town Administrator at its Wednesday night meeting, Aug. 16, according to the BelmontPatch. Details of the contract, including salary, other compensation and duties, will be released once Kale agrees to the terms of the document. While the contract is not yet signed, Mark Paolillo, chairman of the Board, did say that Kale’s first official day in Belmont will be Monday, Aug. 20. Kale, Cambridge’s budget director and deputy finance director since 2003, was chosen in June by the Board to replace Thomas Younger who resigned in October of last year.

New Kent County, Virginia (population 18,429): New Kent County has lost its county administrator, but county officials aren’t saying why, according to the Richmond Times-Dispatch. G. Cabell Lawton IV resigned July 23, a little more than two years after taking the job as administrator. Previously, he had served as county administrator in Fluvanna County. The Board of Supervisors appointed Deputy County Administrator Rodney A. Hathaway as acting administrator on July 25, when the board formally accepted Lawton’s resignation. Hathaway, a Quinton native and eight-year veteran of county government, said Wednesday that he could not comment on Lawton’s resignation because it occurred in a closed session of the board that he did not attend. Supervisors C. Thomas Tiller Jr. and Ron Stiers said Lawton gave no reason for the resignation and they declined to discuss it further. In addition to deputy administrator, Hathaway has been New Kent’s planning manager and economic development director.

Holden, Massachusetts (population 17,346): Town Manager Nancy Galkowski last night announced that she will not seek consideration for a new contract, according to the Telegram. The Board of Selectmen was required to notify Ms. Galkowski before July 31, six months before the end of her three-year contract, whether it would extend her contract. The board met in executive session several times with the stated aim of discussing contract negotiations, but never entered into negotiations with Ms. Galkowski. Board of Selectmen Chairman Anthony Renzoni said town counsel is reviewing when the minutes of those meetings will be released. The board last night postponed a decision on how to proceed with the impending vacancy in the position. Ms. Galkowski made public a July 27 letter removing herself from consideration for contract renewal. Ms. Galkowski, whose contract is up in January, can leave at any time. The letter also said Ms. Galkowski was disappointed not to continue to lead the community, though she listed several accomplishments with pride, including several efficiencies she implemented. Mr. Renzoni thanked Ms. Galkowski and lauded her financial knowledge, which resulted in bringing the town budget in under the constraints the board indicated. Ms. Galkowski, a longtime Holden resident, was the assistant town manager in Arlington when she applied for the Holden position after a dispute over his contract resulted in the departure of Town Manager Brian Bullock. Selectman Mark Ferguson immediately requested that the board avoid the cost and time involved in a lengthy search and appoint assistant town manager Jacquelyn Kelly as the town manager. Ms. Kelly was one of the three finalists when Ms. Galkowski was chosen in 2008 and took office in January 2009, and continued as assistant town manager after the Board of Selectmen made her its second choice. Ms. Kelly has been assistant town manager for 13 years, and was also assistant light department manager for part of that time when the town manager position was joined with the light department manager position. Those positions were separated in 2008. Ms. Kelly also worked for the Planning Department for two years before becoming assistant town manager. Selectman James Jumonville agreed with Mr. Ferguson, arguing to save the town the expense that was incurred in previous searches, to hire a contractor to screen candidates. Mr. Ferguson also argued that, by appointing Ms. Kelly, the town would save the money spent on the assistant town manager position as Ms. Kelley could handle both. Mr. Renzoni cautioned that the town’s strong town manager form of government left the staffing decisions to the town manager, and that the Board of Selectmen was not in the business of changing the form of town government. Mr. Renzoni and Selectman Robert Lavigne argued that, with Ms. Kelly already on board, the town would not be without leadership should Ms. Galkowski leave before a decision about the next town manager is made. The board agreed to table the decision on how to proceed with the selection of a new town manager until the next meeting Sept. 4.

Dukes County, Massachusetts (population 16,535): Martina Thornton was sworn in as the new county manager on Wednesday evening, according to the Vineyard Gazette. Mrs. Thornton, who served as executive assistant to the county manager for four years, said she is pleased with the contract she negotiated with the seven-member elected commission last week in executive session. The terms of Mrs. Thornton’s contract include an annual salary of $67,709. Dukes County government has come under scrutiny in the last few years as county government has gradually been taken over by the state. But Mrs. Thornton defends the niche of county government. Mrs. Thornton, 36, a Czech Republic native, has a law degree from the University of Prague. Before moving to the Island in 2000, she worked for the Department of Finance in Prague. On-Island she worked as a paralegal for two law offices in Edgartown, and ran her own business, bookkeeping and preparing taxes for small businesses for several years. She has worked as a treasurer and clerk for Island Fuel since 2007. After spending summers here for a few years, Mrs. Thornton moved to the Island in 2001 to marry her husband. They have two children, both boys. She will hire an assistant to replace herself, but said she plans to modify the job description to make it more of a clerical position, with less responsibility in some areas. In her new post, she will work closely with county treasurer Noreen Mavro Flanders and county commission chairman Melinda Loberg, as well as Sean Flynn, manager of the Martha’s Vineyard Airport, and the other county and airport commissioners. She described her working relationship with the seven-member county commission as “very good.” The county commissioners have begun their discussion of priorities for Mrs. Thornton’s term. Immediate priorities include reviewing and revising the 2013 budget, as well as working with the six Island towns to create memorandums of understandings for county programs including the Integrated Pest Management program and the Vineyard Health Care Access Program. She also plans to oversee a grant-writing initiative on behalf of the county and the towns, in accordance with the county commissioners’ stated expectations during the county manager search process. In fiscal year 2014, pest management and health care access, regional programs managed by the county, will be financed exclusively by the towns. Mrs. Thornton is charged with meeting with town government leaders to figure out how they want the programs to be managed. Russell Smith, Mrs. Thornton’s predecessor, resigned from the position May 1. The search for the new county manager, which began in mid-April, was delayed when the initial pick for the position, New Hampshire attorney Katherine Rogers, declined the offer in early July, citing personal health reasons. Nineteen people applied for the position last spring.

Green River, Wyoming (population 12,515): The City of Green River will have a full-time city administrator starting Sept. 24, according to The Green River Star. On Monday, the city released a statement announcing that Martin Black of Sarasota, Fla., will take the position. According to his LinkedIn profile, he currently is the senior practice builder – project manager for Kimley-Horn and Associates Inc. He also lists himself as a consultant. He previously served as the deputy city manager and city manager in Venice, Fla. He also worked as a community services manager in Longboart Key, Fla., and the utilities support manager and zoning administrator in Tallahassee, Fla. Councilman Gary Killpack said he believes Black will bring a total package in being able to deal with residents personably while handing other administrative aspects of the position. Killpack described Black as vary likable and proactive while being very direct.

Cocoa Beach, Florida (population 11,231): A government administrator from another Florida beachfront tourist town will take over as city manager this fall, according to Florida Today. Bob Majka of Panama City, who works as assistant county manager of Bay County, was picked Monday from a field of 124 applicants to succeed longtime Cocoa Beach City Manager Chuck Billias, who is retiring. Majka, who turned 42 last week, has racked up 23 years of service with Panhandle government. Hired as a Panama City firefighter-EMT in 1989, he advanced to Bay County hazardous materials program manager in 1993, emergency management director in 1995, chief of emergency services in 1998 and assistant county manager in 2006. During a special meeting Monday afternoon — after only 3 minutes of discussion — the Cocoa Beach City Commission unanimously picked Majka over three other finalists. Billias is retiring after serving at Cocoa Beach City Hall in various capacities since 1971. He earns $113,797 per year. Beeler will now negotiate salary, pension, moving allowance and other details of a proposed employment contract with Majka. Participants will include City Attorney Skip Fowler and Colin Baenziger, who heads the Wellington firm that conducted the job search. Baenziger estimated it might take two weeks to negotiate a deal. Commissioners will then vote on the contract. Beeler said he hopes Majka starts work by October. The quartet of finalists mingled during a business-casual reception Friday night at the Cocoa Beach Country Club, then attended 30-minute interviews Saturday and Sunday. Majka said it will be “bittersweet” to leave Bay County, but he seeks professional advancement. His girlfriend is originally from Brevard County and has relatives on the Space Coast. His father attended Brevard Engineering College, the predecessor of Florida Tech, during the 1960s.

St. Albans, Vermont (population 6,392): The town of St. Albans needs a new manager, according to WCAX. Gerry Myers is leaving his post to take a job in the private sector. He’ll be leaving at the end of September.

Brunswick, Maryland (population 5,870): Brunswick City Administrator Rick Weldon has resigned, making him the second city official to do so in the wake of last week’s mayoral and city council election, according to The Frederick News-Post. Weldon said Monday he has diverging views on a variety of issues, including the role of government, with Mayor-elect Karin Tome. He said he did not want to potentially make Tome’s job more difficult by going into detail. Tome takes office today. Weldon officially resigned Friday. He said he planned to put in his last day Aug. 24, though he told Tome he would be willing to stay on longer, albeit not indefinitely, while a replacement is found. The decision has disappointed some residents and city officials, including Tome. She said she had a sense Weldon might resign after speaking with him several weeks ago about the issue. During her door-to-door campaigning, many residents asked her if Weldon planned to stay on, she said. Tome said Weldon was a good mediator and will be missed. Rumors spread online and elsewhere that Tome was seeking former Frederick County Commissioner Kai Hagen to fill the slot, but they are false, she said. No definite plans for a replacement have been made, she said. Tome said there will likely be a few local candidates for the job, and she believes the city should also open up the search outside of Brunswick. Weldon has been the city administrator since January 2011, his second time in the position, he said. He also worked as the Brunswick city administrator from 1994 to 1999. Before his most recent stint in Brunswick, Weldon spent a year as Frederick City Mayor Randy McClement’s executive assistant. He represented portions of Frederick and Washington counties in the Maryland House of Delegates from 2003 to 2009, when he left a year early in his last term to work for McClement. From 2001 to 2003, Weldon served as Frederick County commissioner. Apart from his legislative duties, he worked as the executive director of the United Way of Frederick from 2008 to 2009. Although he did not specify, Weldon said plans for his future could include a role outside politics. He said he would also be interested in becoming a county executive, though he didn’t believe a county executive form of government would be approved by Frederick County voters in November. Councilwoman Angel White, who was re-elected to a four-year term last week, said she believed Weldon had the best interest of the city at heart. White said Weldon was a good person with a strong work ethic. She said she understood that some residents will be disappointed. Last Wednesday, city Councilman Tom Smith also stepped down, two years early from his position to spend more time with his family, he said. He also said Tome’s election played a role in his decision. Carroll Jones, who was packing his belongings Monday during his last day in office as Brunswick’s mayor, said Weldon brought a lot of knowledge, as well as a long list of contacts, to his position. Melanie DiPasquale, owner of Beans in the Belfry, said Weldon’s decision came as a surprise. She said she’s always had an excellent working relationship with Weldon. Weldon has been a regular customer at the restaurant, which is located within a block of City Hall, she said.

Broken Bow, Nebraska (population 3,559): Mayor Cecil Burt received a resignation letter from City Administrator Tony Tolstedt, according to the Kearney Hub. Tolstedt told the Hub he has accepted a job as city administrator in Douglas, Wyo., and begins there on Sept. 17. Until then, he will remain on staff at Broken Bow.

Cherryvale, Kansas (population 2,367): Cherokee County Attorney John Bullard has his post election plans set, according to the Cherokee County News-Advocate. Bullard, who decided not to run for a second term, will be the new Cherryvale city manager. Indeed, he’s already started. Depending upon the results of the Nov. 6 general election, either Republican Nathan Coleman, or Democrat Melanie Bingham will be the new county attorney come January. Bingham was recently hired to be special assistant county attorney by Bullard to take up some of the slack caused by his split duties. In a press release Bingham said she was looking forward to working in the office. Bullard said the Cherryvale job is a good fit for him. Bullard said he is excited about his new job, but is sad to leave Columbus.

Jefferson, Texas (population 2,106): Jefferson’s city administrator Shawn Farrell turned in his resignation — again — effective Monday morning — nearly four months after he tried to resign in March, according to The Marshall News Messenger. During that time, Mayor Jeff Fratangelo asked Farrell during a public meeting to reconsider his decision, and at least stay until the end of his contract, Sept. 5. Farrell agreed at the time, but decided on Monday that it was time to leave. Although the resignation comes a month earlier than expected, Ward 3 Alderman Carey Heaster said the city is in a good position and have already received applications in lieu of Farrell’s earlier resignation. The Jefferson City Council has been advertising for the position, posting it on various websites for a while now. Heaster noted that they have received about a dozen applications so far. He said the council is not in a rush to replace Farrell, however. Since his initial resignation, Farrell has been tight-lipped regarding his decision to leave. Farrell was hired last September, following the resignation of former city administrator Tony Williams who verbally resigned last January, a day after the council denied his recommendation to fire City Secretary Doris Hines. Williams had served in that capacity for the city for only 10 months. Mayor Fratangelo served dual roles as both mayor and city administrator until Farrell was hired.

New Buffalo, Michigan (population 1,883): After less than 18 months on the job, Michael “Mitch” Mitchell has resigned from his position as the city manager of New Buffalo, according to The Harbor County News. New Buffalo Mayor Rusty Geisler made the announcement shortly after he and three members of the New Buffalo City Council (council member Susan Maroko was absent) reconvened an Aug. 10 special meeting at City Hall following a brief closed-session discussion regarding the city manager in what was simply described as a “personnel” matter on the agenda. It was then that Mayor Geisler read aloud Mitchell’s letter of resignation, which simply stated that, “I, Michael D. Mitchell, hereby resign effective at 5 p.m. Friday, Aug. 10.” The letter was dated Aug. 9. Mitchell’s resignation letter offered no clues as to the reason for his decision, which the mayor said was “unexpected.” Subsequent attempts to reach Mitchell by phone were unsuccessful. Asked, after the special meeting, if there were any job-related issues with the city manager that might have led to his voluntary departure, Geisler stated that, in his opinion, Mitchell had been doing “a good job.” Several weeks earlier, however, during a July 17 meeting of the council, Geisler had commented that he was “truly disappointed” by the city manager’s failure to meet a Pokagon Fund grant application deadline that could have provided $31,000 for the purchase of new turnout gear for the city’s Fire Department.(Mitchell is said to have missed the deadline by more than a month.) The mayor quickly moved on to address other matters that day. It was the first time since Mitchell’s hiring last year that the mayor had voiced dissatisfaction with something the city manager had done — or, in that case, had not done — at a City Council meeting. After returning from their closed-session meeting on Aug. 10, the council voted unanimousy (4-0) to accept Mitchell’s resignation, but also to continue his health and dental insurance until the end of the year or until he finds another job, whichever comes first. Mayor Geisler said that the search for a new city manager will probably begin at the next regular meeting of the City Council, which is scheduled for Tuesday, Aug. 21.

Hallsville, Missouri (population 1,478): Hallsville’s controversial city administrator is out of a job after city leaders voted Monday night to eliminate the position, according to KRCG. Joe Smith was told Tuesday this morning that it was his last day. Smith then resigned. The move came in a closed door meeting Monday night. With three yes votes and one city alderman abstaining the position was eliminated to save the city money. Aldermen Mickey Nichols, Hugh Carney and Darren Maher voted in favor of getting rid of the position, Alderman Carl Daly abstained. Mayor Cheri Reisch said the move will save Smith’s salary and benefits totaling around $60,000. She said the money is needed for the city’s general fund to balance the budget. That fund pays the salaries of the city’s seven other full-time employees and several part time ones. Smith has been under fire since firing Reisch last December. Reisch had served 30-years as Hallsville City Clerk. She ran for mayor and won last April. Reisch did not get to vote during the closed meeting, the mayor’s vote only breaks ties. She says the move to remove Smith was not about her, but was in the best interest of the city. The city budget, minus the administrator position will now be up for vote during the next aldermans’ meeting August 27th.

La Grange, Missouri (population 931): Mayor Ronnie Powers of LaGrange said Wednesday neither City Administrator Mark Campbell or police officer Jason Powell knew they were going to be relieved of their duties before Monday night’s City Council meeting, according to the Quincy Herald-Whig. Campbell and Powell were relieved of their duties in a decision made by the council, Powers said. Powers, who has been mayor since 2009 and a North Ward councilman before that, said economics played no factor in the dismissals. Powers also said the dismissals were immediate. Attempts to reach Campbell and Powell were unsuccessful. Campbell had been city administrator since June 2004. Campbell succeeded Drew Bontrager, who was LaGange’s first city administrator.

Tranistions: Eau Claire, WI; Stanton, CA; Milton, MA and more

Eau Claire, Wisconsin (65,489): The Eau Claire City Council says its finalist for the job is the current manager of the Village of Brown Deer, Wisconsin, according to WEAU. The council says it picked Russell Van Gompel, who has been the manager in Brown Deer for 14 years. He’s expected to start in early November. The council will formally take up his contract details on August 14. They say the interim city manager, Brian Amundson, will continue to serve in that role until Van Gompel starts. Van Gompel has also been a village administrator and finance director. He graduated from UW-Oshkosh with a degree in business.

Stanton, California (population 36,186): Stanton’s city manager Carol Jacobs will be resigning her post Sept. 6 to serve as the city manager in Eastvale in Riverside County, according to the Garden Grove Journal. Jacobs has served Stanton as its administrative services director and as its city manager for six years. The official position of city manager will go unfilled and its duties, according to Shawver, will be taken over by Jim Box, the assistant city manager. Jacobs’ latest ongoing challenge for the city of Stanton has been to balance the budget. Economic drop out creating a gap between revenue and necessary expenditures caused a fiscal emergency in Stanton over the last few years. Now, massive cuts have been made to the employee pay, staffing and services available in the city. There are now fewer than 20 city employees in Stanton. Contracts with Orange County Fire Authority and Orange County Sherriff’s Department have been re-negotiated in order to bring down the climb of annual costs for public safety in the city.

Milton, Massachusetts (population 27,003): With the controversy over Town Administrator Kevin Mearn still lingering, Milton selectmen will accept applications in the next few weeks from private recruiters and residents interested in serving on a committee to help find the next town administrator, according to The Boston Globe. Selectmen voted 2-to-1 on July to not renew former Mearn’s contract, then voted three days later to terminate his contract. The two selectmen favoring his ouster expressed concerns about communication between Mearn, selectmen, and Police Chief Richard Wells. The decision to form a search committee of five to seven people has not been formalized with a vote, but selectmen agreed to each submit two names to the pool of applicants. A vote is expected to formalize the process at an Aug. 23 meeting. Prior to the discussion about forming a committee, Chairman Tom Hurley read from a statement in which he expressed frustration with the way the town administrator’s contract vote was executed. Selectman Bob Sweeney responded to Hurley’s statement and requested that the board move past controversies surrounding the vote. Selectman Denis Keohane chastised Hurley for not giving himself and Sweeney proper notice of his statement and said that while he does have a response, he was not prepared to give it Thursday night.

Statesville, North Carolina (population 24,532): Statesville City Manager Rob Hites surprised city council members and fellow senior city employees when he announced Monday that he would be retiring from his post effective Aug. 31, according to the Statesville Record & Landmark. Hites, who was hired by the city in February 1998, has spent nearly half of his 30 years in city government working as Statesville’s top executive. Hites said he had planned to retire next year but expedited his plans when the council approved a cost-cutting plan of offering retirement packages to certain qualified employees as a means of trimming the workforce. Hites said he planned to announce his retirement plans at the council’s pre-agenda meeting last Thursday but the meeting was cancelled earlier in the day when it was learned that the meeting would not have a quorum. He said that he had known since early last month that he would be taking the retirement package but kept the information to Assistant City Manager Lynn Smyth and Kutteh. Hites, 60, said he did not know what his immediate plans would be. He said he would like to teach U.S. history or government at the college or high school level but did not say that he would necessarily pursue that path. Prior to coming to Statesville, Hites was city/town manager in Lumberton, Southport and Pittsboro. He also worked in the governments of Durham and Gibsonville and as a contractor for the city of Greensboro. Of the 33 city employees who qualified for the retirement package, only 16 accepted. The council can choose to hire a new city manager from the current staff or advertise to seek external candidates for the position. Hites is earning a salary of just under $129,000.

Woodstock, Illinois (20,151): Tim Clifton will retire in April after serving nearly 20 years as Woodstock’s city manager, according to The Woodstock Independent. Mayor Brian Sager announced the planned retirement July 23 and said the Woodstock City Council will determine a specific search process and timeline for hiring a new city manager at its Sept. 4 meeting. Sager said Clifton has brought strong leadership and professionalism to the position and the impacts of his leadership can be seen throughout the city. Clifton was hired as city manger in November 1993. Before coming to Woodstock, Clifton worked as district customer support manager and governmental marketing consultant at Unisys in Okemos, Mich. He served as city manager of Monroe, Mich. and Boyne City, Mich., and as assistant city manager of Kalamazoo, Mich., before that. While Clifton didn’t point to one single accomplishment during his tenure, he said every city manager wants to leave with their city in a better position when they leave, something he believes has been accomplished. He pointed to the capital improvement programs, the tax increment financing istrict, the economic growth in the city and the management of city finances during difficult economic years as positives during his tenure. While the Council faces the challenge of hiring a new city manager, Clifton said he knows to step out of the way. From now until April, Clifton said he is focused on the tasks at hand. He said various economic development projects, potential retail opportunities and a major year in terms of road construction will keep him busy until his final day as city manager. Sager said he is confident the city will move forward in a positive manner.

Port Angeles, Washington (population 19,038): The Port Angeles city council last night approved a new contract for Dan McKeen to be the next city manager, according to KONP. The former PA fire chief will make $135-thousand dollars a year in his new job. That’s the same amount he was making as the interim manager and is 22 thousand dollars less than Kent Myers made when he left in April. Mayor Cherie Kidd says McKeen also agreed to take out any special benefits that were afforded the city manager and will take the same benefit package as any other department head. McKeen also will get a car allowance of $375 a month. The previous manager’s contract called for the city to purchase a new car and pay more than 62-hundred dollars a year in car allowance. Kidd says she is happy with the contract and shows McKeen’s willingness to be fair and help the city during a tough budget period as well.

North Aurora, Illinois (population 16,760): The village is having to look for a new village administrator, according to the Kane County Chronicle. Village Administrator Wes Kornowske has resigned to take a position with a national trucking company in Green Bay, Wis. His last day is Aug. 23. He did not name the company, saying it was a private firm. Kornowske is from Green Bay. North Aurora Police Chief David Summer will be interim administrator. Kornowske had been the village’s chief administrative officer since March 2010 before being promoted to village administrator last year.

Panama City Beach, Florida (population 12,108): After announcing his retirement more than one year ago, Richard Jackson, Panama City Beach’s city manager of 33 years, has finally set a quit date, according to the News Herald. The Panama City Beach Council approved a resolution accepting the $120,000 per year contract for new City Manager Mario Gisbert at Thursday’s regular council meeting. Gisbert assumed his position as the new Panama City Beach City Manager at 12:01 a.m. Friday when his contract went into effect. Jackson will continue working with Gisbert during the transition period through the end of September. The contract will remain in effect until terminated by either the city or Gisbert. His $120,000 per year salary includes benefits. Gisbert, who has been the city’s assistant manager and Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) project manager for two years, was appointed by the council in late June to replace Jackson. Gisbert, an architect by trade, also held a land development position with the St. Joe Co. The contract, drafted by Baenziger and Associates, the firm hired to coordinate the job search, outlines Gisbert’s salary and evaluation procedures, duties and obligations and grounds for termination. Baenziger and Associates filtered 132 applications for the position and brought back eight finalists to the council. Gisbert was not chosen as a finalist, but was added back to the list upon request by Councilman Keith Curry. After the council further narrowed down the list, Gisbert beat out five other finalists for city manager position, including Bay County Assistant Manager Bob Majka, garnering three of the five votes from the council.

Colusa, California (population 5,971): Colusa and Jan McClintock simply did not mix, according to the Colusa Sun-Herald. That is the headline reason Councilman Tom Reische and Kirk Kelleher gave the day after leading a 3-2 majority vote to terminate the contract of the embattled city manager. The City Council on Tuesday night fired McClintock — ending the longest tenure of any of the many administrators who had come before her. The action goes into effect in two weeks. The vote, with Councilwomen Donna Critchfield and Kay Hosmer dissenting, followed McClintock outlining what she believed to be four years of successes and stable leadership as city manager. McClintock’s usually vocal critics sat quietly in the chamber gallery, and her fiercest council foes offered no comment either despite the outgoing city manager’s own objections to how she had been treated with false accusations from the public, and distrust and deception by the council in recent months. But Reische said Wednesday the situation had gotten to a boiling point, adding McClintock had simply alienated too many people inside City Hall and out. He specifically blamed McClintock for the poor relationship the city has had with the county and a number of local business owners. Kelleher would not elaborate on the issues behind his vote. He said it was a culmination of things, and now that the decision was made, it is time to move forward. Critchfield and Hosmer lashed out at the council majority before casting their votes, accusing them of having personal agendas and failing their fiscal responsibility to the city. Critchfield did not identify the employee, but four independent sources confirmed it involved public works employee John Baldarama over a linen service contract. McClintock disciplined Baldarama because he apparently did not have the authority to execute the contract, and the issue expanded from there. Kelleher said he knew very little about the details of that situation and denied that it was part of his reasons to fire McClintock. Reische said he thought the city manager was in the wrong, but said general issues with city staff and not one specific incident influenced his vote. Hosmer followed in the same vein as Critchfield, accusing some of the council members of serving their own “personal” and “political” needs rather than the city’s welfare. She said the decision to end the contract now, instead of allowing retirement as presented in McClintock’s proposal dated June 28, will cost the city significantly. Hosmer specifically noted the city’s obligation to pay McClintock’s health benefits for life. That situation is created because McClintock announced she intends to retire anyway, making her eligible for the PERS benefit unless she returns to another public position within that system. At her current rate, the city will pay $704 each month. That can change annually, depending on what plan the former city manager chooses. When McClintock becomes eligible for Social Security, the city’s obligation lowers to a supplemental cost, the current average of which is $225.99 monthly. But the cost to the city is balanced by some savings as well. McClintock’s salary was $93,862 annually, minus 2.5 percent ($1,346.55) that was withheld as part of her performance clause. Additionally, the city will not be paying her car stipend of about $350 a month. So the savings through the end of the year would be about $34,270 — all but $1,400 in salary — and less if McClintock left as early as Nov. 7 as stated in her retirement proposal. However, the city is also paying Randy Dunn an additional $2,237.72 per month for handling the duties as acting city manager — a cost that is expected to extend into the new year. The City Council approved the compensation package unanimously Tuesday night. It is based on 30 percent of his salary as fire chief. Reische and Critchfield are on the ad hoc committee looking into the recruitment process. The division between the Reische-Kelleher camp and the Critchfield-Hosmer camp is no surprise. The council members have lined up on opposite sides of many issues, and the political rhetoric has become more personal in recent months. In the end, Mayor Pat Landreth had the deciding vote. The mayor thanked McClintock for her service, then repeated his public refrain that the city needed to move forward. Landreth has said the city was in a kind “of limbo” because of all the division and discourse — and understood McClintock has been at the center of that storm. She has been on paid administrative leave since July 17.

North Hampton, New Hampshire (population 4,301): North Hampton has an immediate need to select an interim Town Administrator to take over until a permanent replacement can be found for outgoing administrator Steve Fournier, who will begin his new post as Newmarket’s town administrator after Labor Day, according to the Hampton-North Hampton Patch. Fournier has spent five years as North Hampton’s town administrator. After a nonpublic meeting of the Select Board Thursday night with Fournier, the Select Board openly discussed the next steps in the search process. Chairman Jim Maggiore said he had been in contact with Newmarket Town Councilor Al Zink and asked if the council could share some of its applicants’ resumes with North Hampton. Select Board member Larry Miller said he didn’t want the process for selecting a new town administrator to spread out over nine months, as the Newmarket search did. Select Board member Phillip Wilson said he suggested looking at three factors when weighing a new candidate. After some discussion, Maggiore said the board will come back to the Select Board meeting on Monday, Aug. 13, prepared to talk about the challenges and characteristics they would look for in a candidate. They are also considering using a recruitment company to help with the search. They also said Monday would be the target date to come up with an ad to look for an interim town administrator. Fournier said he would help to identify recruitment companies as well as prepare an ad for the interim administrator based on his own job description. One 30-year resident attended the meeting last night. He thanked Fournier for a job well done and also suggested the town look into changing the role of town administrator to town manager.

Milo, Maine (population 1,847): A former town official from Belfast will be the town’s new manager if he accepts a $60,000 contract, interim town manager Roger Raymond said Thursday, according to the Bangor Daily News. With Selectman Donald Banker opposing, the Board of Selectmen voted 3-1 during a special meeting on Thursday to offer David Maynard the contract, Raymond said. Maynard indicated that the salary is acceptable and is expected to sign the contract on Friday, Raymond said. If he does, he will start work on Aug. 21. Maynard would succeed Jeff Gahagan. Gahagan resigned as the treasurer of the Three Rivers Kiwanis club on April 5, a day before resigning as town manager, in the midst of an investigation by the Piscataquis County Sheriff’s Department, according to Piscataquis County District Attorney R. Christopher Almy. The investigation continues. Gahagan told town leaders that he was resigning from the town manager position for health reasons. No allegations about any missing town money have surfaced, but selectmen said they will have an auditor review town finances from April 23 on as a precaution. Raymond was also hired that month. The board praised Gahagan for what they described as his superb work as town manager, saying that when he took the job, the town was in heavy debt and now carries a $500,000 balance. A later audit of a shared town-Kiwanis club account showed $600 missing, officials have said. Police Chief Damien Pickel referred comment on the investigation to the Piscataquis County Sheriff’s Department. A dispatcher said that no one handling the investigation was available early Thursday night. Maynard worked for Belfast as town manager from 1982 to 1986 before moving out of state, Raymond said. Raymond said he had no further details about Maynard because he was not part of the selection process. He referred comment on the matter to Wilma Stanchfield, chairwoman of the Board of Selectmen. Stanchfield did not immediately return a call placed to her home on Thursday night.

Transitions: Chino, CA; St. Joseph County, MI; Coös County, NH and more

Matthew BallantyneChino, California (population 77,983): City Manager Matthew Ballantyne will be introduced and take his oath of office during Tuesday’s City Council meeting, according to the Contra Costa Times. Ballantyne’s first official day with the city was Aug. 1. Tuesday will be his first City Council meeting. Ballantyne comes to the city with about 17 years of public service. He was San Marino’s top administrator. The 38-year-old will fill the shoes of former City Manager Patrick Glover who retired when his contract ended in February. The City Council appointed Police Chief Miles Pruitt as the interim city manager while the search for a new city manager was conducted. Bob Murray and Associates was hired to conduct a nation-wide search. More than 70 applicants applied for the job.

St. Joseph County, Michigan (population 61,295): St. Joseph County Administrator Judy West-Wing has announced she will be resigning in January, according to WLKM.  The 53-year-old West-Wing presented her letter of resignation during Friday morning’s executive committee meeting of the county board. West-Wing, a Flint-area native, has been county administrator for 20 of her 30 years of employment with St. Joseph County.  West-Wing said she wishes to spend more time with her 10-year-old daughter and will leave the job with a heavy heart. Her resignation is effective Jan. 23.  She is only the second person to hold the county’s highest, non-elected position, succeeding Patrick Yoder in 1993.  Board chairman Rick Shaffer said commissioners during their meeting Monday will establish a date to meet and discuss a procedure to secure a new county administrator.

Coös County, New Hampshire (population 33,055): A five-and-a-half-month-long transition period began on Wednesday, July 18, when the three-man board of county commissioners selected the county’s current Director of Finance, Jennifer Fish of Colebrook, to succeed incumbent Sue Collins as county administrator when she retires at year’s end, according to New Hampshire Lakes and Mountains. When she takes the lead job on Jan. 1, 2013, Fish will not only fulfill her new responsibilities but also continue her finance duties. She explained that she did not apply for the top slot when it was first advertised, believing that the presence of an inside candidate might discourage even highly qualified people from applying. Only when the person said to be the top candidate withdrew his resume did Fish apply. Fish graduated from Pittsburg High School in the 18-member Class of 1991; graduated in 1995 from Keene State College with a B.S. in Management; and earned her M.B.A. in 2003 from Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles, Cal. As a new college graduate, she first worked for Peoples Heritage Financial Group of Keene as an internal auditor and then headed west to work in the entertainment industry for eight years. She returned to Coös and worked from 2006 to 2010 at the First Colebrook Bank in Colebrook before joining the county’s administrative team. Fish said that she was fortunate to have worked with a fine team at First Colebrook as well as under the direct supervision of county administrator Collins, learning the ropes. Fish’s parents, Jarvis and Carlene Fish of Pittsburg, are retired, and her only sibling, a sister, lives downstate. Both her grandmothers — Bernice Fish and Mildred Young — also live in Pittsburg. Fish does not intend to live on the single-family house on the grounds of the Coös County complex in West Stewartstown, but will continue to live in Colebrook. Her salary has not yet been set.

East Palo Alto, California (population 28,155): The East Palo Alto City Council has selected its new city manager, according to The Daily Journal. The selection of Magda Gonzalez came in the wake of an extensive six-month search that included nearly 80 candidates from across the country, city officials said. Gonzalez and the city are still negotiating a contract, according to the mayor’s office. Formerly the deputy city manager in Redwood City, Gonzalez has experience in a number of executive positions in Belmont and San Bruno, as well as Redwood City. Mayor Laura Martinez said in a statement that the city is looking forward to the addition of Gonzalez and her “strong leadership and managerial skills.” Gonzalez received the “Rising Star Award” in 2008 from the Municipal Managers Association of Northern California. She replaces ML Gordon, who retired in March.

Martinsville, Virginia (population 13,821): Martinsville Interim City Manager Leon Towarnicki is remaining silent about whether he has applied for the post on a permanent basis, according to the Martinsville Bulletin. Sunday was the deadline to apply. He said that if he was to say publicly that he did not apply, there might be speculation as to why. On the other hand, Towarnicki said that if he was to say that he applied, it might put “certain expectations” on Martinsville City Council to give him the job automatically, considering he has been doing it for about eight months. The council employs the city manager, who is the city’s top administrator. Springsted Inc., a Richmond executive recruitment firm, is coordinating the city manager search. On Aug. 14, the firm is to give the council a report on the applicants, said Martinsville Mayor Kim Adkins. Under state law, information on specific applicants could be discussed in closed session. However, Adkins said general information about the status of the search, such as how many people applied and where they are from, will be presented during open session. The council hopes to announce the hiring of a new city manager during the week of Sept. 10, she said. Martinsville has been without a city manager since Clarence Monday left the position in January. He now is county administrator in Amherst County. The council named Towarnicki, the city’s assistant city manager and public works director, interim city manager in December after Monday resigned. A Henry County native, Towarnicki worked for a private engineering firm in Greensboro, N.C., before he was named Martinsville’s city engineer in 1982. Two years later, he was appointed public works director. He was appointed assistant city manager in 2007. The advertisement for the city manager’s job said the council aims to hire someone with at least five to seven years of public or private management experience as a chief or deputy chief executive in an organization of similar size to Martinsville’s city government. Other qualifications, according to Adkins and the ad, include understanding how municipalities operate and experience in strategic planning, finance and budgeting, economic development and redevelopment and bringing people together to solve community problems among a diverse population. The next city manager will earn between $95,000 and $115,000 a year plus benefits, based on experience and qualifications, the announcement shows. When he left Martinsville, Monday was earning $118,320 annually.

Bonham, Texas (population 10,127): Bonham has named their new city manger, according to KXII. Wednesday was his first day in office. Tuesday, Bonham City Council unanimously voted Bill Shipp into office. Shipp has worked for several North Texas cities for 17 years. He will serve as Bonham’s City Manager for at least 3 years. Shipp was recently the City Manager to Royse City and before that, he was the City Manger of Commerce.

Hillsborough, New Hampshire (population 6,011): Legal bills totaling more than $46,000 probably could have been avoided if the board of selectmen had responded sooner to complaints coming from town hall, but now that the problem appears to be solved, people seem to be struggling to move on, said Board Chairman Russell Galpin, according to the Union Leader. In 2010, before Galpin joined the board of selectmen, he said he heard complaints from town employees over their treatment by then-town administrator John Stetser. Allegations that Stetser was making other people do his job and was sexually harassing some of the town’s female employees were not news to his ears when he joined the board. And when those allegations kept coming, he tried to do something about it. Stetser resigned in June at the end of an investigation conducted on behalf of the board by attorney Emily Rice of Orr & Reno in Concord. Rice was hired to conduct an investigation of Stetser’s job performance and employee interaction after the board of selectmen received a letter from four female employees questioning the town administrator’s professionalism. Galpin said the allegations, many of them involving sexual harassment, had been ignored by the previous board of selectmen, but the new board took action by bringing in Rice to investigate. Although Stetser told the Union Leader in March that he was surprised by the allegations, Galpin said he had been told what the employees’ complaints were on many occasions but failed to modify his behavior, according to reports from the employees to the board. In fact, Galpin said, Stetser was accused of sexually harassing an employee on election day of this year, while Rice was conducting her investigation. At the end of the investigation, which cost around $38,600 in bills from Rice and another $8,000 for counsel with the town’s attorney, Galpin said, Stetser resigned. Galpin wouldn’t say what the investigation uncovered because it’s been sealed, but he did say that Stetser resigned without asking for any kind of severance package or other compensation. Now that Stetser is gone, the town is looking to move on, Galpin said. There are factions in town who have treated the women who complained about Stetser as though they’re the guilty parties, he said, and that has had an impact on morale. But now the focus is on finding a new town administrator who can unify the employees at town hall and turn the attention back to the business of the town, Galpin said. Anyone interested in the position can apply here.

Ocean View, Delaware (population 1,882): The search is once again complete and Ocean View has a new town manager, according to DelMarVaNOW. Dianne Vogel of Las Vegas accepted the position and will assume her role in early September, after she relocates to her home in Ocean View. The search committee, which included Mayor Gordon Wood and councilmen Tom Sheeran and Bob Lawless, narrowed down the applicants of about 36 to the top three before they were authorized by council to extend an offer to Vogel. The committee looked at experience, educational background and other qualifications. The town manager serves as the chief administrative officer. Vogel served as a community manager of several large communities and homeowner associations in the Las Vegas area; managed the day-to-day operations in a large community association management group in Rehoboth Beach; and served as director of finance and management for the Montgomery Village Foundation in Gaithersburg, Md. The responsibilities of the town manager include financial management and budgeting; community and intergovernmental relations; enforcing provisions of the Town Charter and Code; coordination and direction of activities of departments; and effective management of long-range planning and the administrative affairs of the town. Her experience providing professional management services to communities and homeowner associations, as well as working with property owners and staff of those organizations, will also be a benefit. The town will host a meet and greet at Town Hall shortly after Vogel joins Ocean View to allow residents to get to know the new town manager. After the abrupt departure of Rick Konrad — who resigned less than two weeks after stepping into the position, citing personal reasons — and the difficulties other towns, such as Dewey Beach, are having with town managers, Wood said he’s pleased to have the search behind him.

Millington, Maryland (population 642): The new Millington town manager, who will be shared with Sudlersville, already comes with more than seven years experience working for the municipality, according to The Star Democrat. Millington Mayor Ed Robinson announced July 27 that Clerk-Treasurer Jo Manning has been promoted. Manning replaces Steve Walls, who departed July 13 to become the new head of public works for Centreville. Walls served as town manager for both Millington and Sudlersville through the Maryland Rural Develeopment Corp.’s circuit rider program. After his departure, though, the two towns decided they could share the costs of the town manager position without MRDC’s involvement. Robinson said the Millington Town Council made its decision official July 26, while the Sudlersville commissioners agreed the next day to hire Manning. Robinson and Councilman C.J. Morales represented Millington on the committee that reviewed the five applications received and interviewed the top two candidates. Town Commissioners William Faust and E.T. Kimble handled the work for Sudlersville. Manning’s promotion left the town clerk position open in Millington, but the council already has agreed on how to fill it. Michelle Thompson, Sudlersville clerk-treasurer, now will split her time between the two towns as well. Robinson said Thompson was working only 20 hours a week for Sudlersville, and will add 20 more hours in Millington to her schedule. Thompson will be in Millington from 8 a.m. to noon Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, and from 1 to 5 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursday. She will work the morning shift in Sudlersville on Tuesdays and Thursdays, and the afternoon shift on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. Robinson said the towns are working with Verizon so Thompson will be available 40 hours a week at the existing town hall phone numbers. Someone from Millington wishing to speak with Thompson when she is in Sudlersville will be able to call the Millington town office and it still will ring directly to Thompson. Robinson said she also will have a laptop with information for both municipalities, so she will be able to answer any questions. Robinson thinks having Manning and Thompson splitting their time between Millington and Sudlersville will not be an issue because both towns are very “compatible.” He said besides being so close to each other and being of similar size, Millington and Sudlersville both rely on the Maryland Environmental Service to manage their water and wastewater systems. Robinson is elated such a deal could be worked out with the neighboring town. He said if splitting the two positions does prove troublesome, the towns will explore other options.

Transitions: Buena Park, CA; Coon Rapids, MN; Grundy County, IL and more

Jim Vanderpool

Buena Park, California (population 80,530): In mid-July, City Manager Rick Warsinski took an early retirement after more than 30 years of service at City Hall, according to The Orange County Register. As part of his separation agreement negotiated with the City Council, he didn’t walk away empty-handed; instead, he got a city check totaling nearly $500,000, a combination of separation pay, built-up vacation and accrued sick leave. The bulk of the payoff came from the last two items, especially the sick leave, which alone accounted for nearly half of the $496,014.91 total. In an interview during his last few days as city manager, Warsinski said the sick leave and vacation built up because he rarely took time off. Warsinski noted that there were years he didn’t take a vacation at all, such as when he served as both the city’s planning director and interim city manager. The heft of the check caused consternation from some City Council members when they voted to approve the payout earlier this summer, though they conceded Warsinski’s contract with the city entitled him to the money. Earlier this year, Warsinski had announced his retirement, effective Dec. 31, a date, he said, he chose to give the City Council plenty of time to find a successor. Mayor Jim Dow and other council members negotiated an early retirement with Warsinski, avoiding what they termed a “lame duck” situation, and appointed then-Deputy City Manger Jim Vanderpool to take the top spot. Had the council fired Warsinski or laid him off, Dow said, they would have had to pay him an additional amount of about $100,000. That’s because of Warsinski’s contract with the city, which dictates a severance package of nine months’ salary; instead, he was paid five months of pay. Here’s how the payoff breaks down per item, according to Finance Department records: Warsinski negotiated about five months of “early retirement incentive” – the salary he would have earned if he had stayed and worked until his original retirement date of Dec. 31. That comes out to $106,114.66. He had 1,382.57 hours of vacation – 173 days’ work, about 8 months, based on an 8-hour workday – cashed out for $169,282.35. Finally, like many municipal employees, Warsinski was entitled to be paid for unused sick time. That came out to 1,801.85 hours – 225 days – for a cash amount of $220,617.90. At the time he left, Warsinski was the second-highest compensated city manager in Orange County. A 2011 grand jury report listed his salary at $239,954 in base pay, with another $105,035 in benefits. He was second only to Laguna Hills’ Bruce Channing, whose base pay was lower at $233,592, but earned nearly $145,000 in benefits to claim the top spot. Vanderpool now earns $209,460 in base salary. His contract stipulates that he will get yearly raises starting in 2014, topping out at $221,484 at the contract’s end date, 2015.

Coon Rapids, Minnesota (population 61,476): Former Coon Rapids City Manager Matt Fulton will get six months’ severance pay as part of the separation agreement between him and the Coon Rapids City Council, according to ABC Newspapers. The council requested and Fulton agreed to submit his resignation as city manager July 18 and the council formally approved both the resignation and separation agreement at a special meeting July 23. Fulton was being paid $135,116.80 a year at the time of his resignation and his six months of severance pay had been spelled out in the employment agreement signed by the council and Fulton when he was hired as city manager in April 2006. Under the terms of the separation agreement, Fulton can take the payment in one lump sum or in bi-weekly payments over a six-month period to minimize tax consequences. The severance payment period began effective with the date of Fulton’s resignation, according to City Attorney David Brodie, who negotiated the separation agreement with an attorney representing Fulton. As well as six months of severance pay, Fulton’s health insurance with the city will stay in place for six months, which was also part of the original employment agreement. In addition, Fulton will be paid 100 percent of his accrued vacation pay, less applicable withholding, with 50 percent of his accrued sick leave being contributed to his MSRS (Minnesota State Retirement System), which administers the city’s post employment health care saving plan and he will also be paid for one unused floating holiday minus tax withholding. Those vacation and sick leave provisions are typical for any employee leaving the city, Brodie said. As part of the agreement, the city waives any right to contest Fulton’s eligibility for this compensation, while at the same time, Fulton specifically releases the city from any claims for benefits, salary, severance payments or any other benefits to which he might otherwise be entitled under the original 2006 employment agreement. While the separation agreement does not preclude Fulton from filing a discrimination charge with the federal EEOC (Equal Employment Opportunity Commission), he does waive his right to any monetary damages. Under the terms of the agreement, the city will reimburse Fulton $750 for his attorney’s fee.

Grundy County, Illinois (population 50,063): Grundy County Administrator Shawn Hamilton has resigned to take a job with the city of Park Ridge, where he will make double his current salary, according to the Morris Daily Herald. Starting Wednesday, Aug. 1, Hamilton will be Park Ridge’s new interim city manager. Hamilton said he had to make his resignation effective immediately in order to start at Park Ridge and be trained by the current manager at Park Ridge. In September, Hamilton was hired as the Grundy County administrator with a one-year contract that paid him $70,000 a year. He will make $140,000 and has a nine-month contract at Park Ridge. Hamilton’s hiring was recommended by Mayor David Schmidt and was approved 5-2 by the Park Ridge Council Monday night. His contract is interim because it can only be as long as the mayor’s term, which has nine months remaining, Hamilton said. Since it’s an interim position, he does not have to move to Park Ridge as of right now. In May, Park Ridge fired City Manager Jim Hock, according to published reports. The council approved his termination unanimously, stating he fell short of expectations. Hock has been with Park Ridge since 2008. Deputy City Manager Juliana Maller took over for Hock, and Hamilton is taking over for her. Hamilton said Hock was making about $195,000 a year when he was manager. Despite some previous bad blood between Hamilton and Grundy County Board Chairman Ron Severson, Hamilton was not looking for a new job when he submitted his resume to Park Ridge. He said he has several former co-workers who live in the Park Ridge area. They told him about the job opening and encouraged him to apply for the position. Hamilton thanked both the chairman and the board for their support. Chairman Severson said Tuesday he wished Hamilton nothing but the best of luck. When Hamilton was hired in September, Severson would not sign his contract, but board member Dave Boggs did instead. In public and through the media, the two have had altercations regarding communication and responsibilities. Hamilton acknowledges in his letter he may need to reimburse the county for a portion of salary for breaking his contract. Severson still believes the county does not need a full-time administrator. When Hamilton was hired, Severson maintained the duties could continue to be filled by Land Use Director Heidi Miller and Board Secretary Sandy Pommier. “There are only 19 counties of 102 in Illinois with administrators,” Severson said Tuesday. He continued that he didn’t feel Grundy needed one. He feels something different could be done, such as an administrative assistant or a contractual person. Severson will be meet with the other 17 board members to get everyone’s opinion on what the county should do next as far as the now open administrator position. The county just finished its budget hearings with its departments and is in the process of setting next year’s budget. Without Hamilton, Severson said the county board committees will handle the remaining budget work.

Cleremont, Florida (population 29,368): The city council wants to have a replacement for longtime City Manager Wayne Saunders on board by Jan.1, 2013, according to The Daily Commercial. But on Monday night, Administrative Services Director Joe Van Zile said at a special city council meeting that he thinks that may be a bit optimistic, referring to the council’s timeframe as “aggressive.” Van Zile wants first to identify the executive search firm that will assist the city in choosing a new city leader. The board decided to advertise for a search firm for two weeks beginning today, followed by a “staff-based committee,” to consist of Van Zile, City Clerk Tracy Ackroyd and City Attorney Dan Mantzaris to review and rank the interested firms. As the process began, the Human Resources Manager was to have been part of the committee, but Councilman Rick Van Wagner wondered if someone on the job for just three months would be prepared to contribute effectively. Accordingly, Mantzaris was chosen to replace her. On Aug. 27, the council will receive the names of the top-ranked firms, along with their proposals. The need for a new city manager in Clermont comes after a “no confidence” vote from three of five council members who expressed concern that Saunders did not have the “vision” they required regarding the future of Clermont and worried about Saunders’ subsequent decision to retire. Saunders’ retirement also comes amid numerous accusations by six former police officers who not only claim they were wrongfully terminated in retaliation for complaining about Police Chief Graham years ago, but also swear there is ongoing corruption and wrongdoing within the department. Those officers and their supporters attended recent city council meetings with picket signs calling for the termination of Graham and police Capt. Jon Johnson. They also criticized Saunders for his lack of leadership. Approximately two weeks ago, Saunders voluntarily retired effective Jan. 1, 2013, but will stay on through Jan. 1, 2014 as a consultant to the new manager, earning his full salary of $141,000. Graham also announced his retirement last week, to become effective in October, on the same day that Saunders recommended an investigation of the Police Department. On Monday, the council also learned that the same firm ultimately chosen to search for a new city manager, will most likely be retained to choose the city’s new police chief.
Caledonia, Wisconsin (population 24,365): Mark Janiuk, the village’s new administrator, is getting acclimated with his new position after a week and a half on the job, according to the Caledonia Patch. Janiuk, who started working in Caledonia July 23, told Patch that “everything is going wonderfully,” during a brief phone interview Wednesday. Earlier this summer, Janiuk was hired as Caledonia’s Village Administrator after Tom Lebak decided to retire. Janiuk has been Sturtevant’s village administrator since 2006. Before that he spent 25 years in the Racine County Corporation Counsel, and when Caledonia was a town he worked as Caledonia’s zoning administrator. The staff working for the Village of Sturtevant has been reduced from 35 to 17 full-time positions and Janiuk works part-time in response to those cuts.  Janiuk has a two-year contract with the village. The terms include paying Janiuk $92,000 a year. He won’t be receiving health insurance or retirement benefits from the Village because he’s already receiving them as a retiree through Racine County.

Woodstock, Illinois (population 20,151): Longtime City Manager Tim Clifton will retire at the end of this fiscal year, according to the Northwest Herald. Clifton has been Woodstock’s city Manager for the past 20 years and will leave his post April 30, and has a lot of work to complete as he wraps up his final nine months on the job. Clifton earns $175,000 a year.

Claremore, Oklahoma (population 18,581): Having gone through several city managers in less than two years, the city would like its next one to stay a while, Mayor Mickey Perry said, according to the Tulsa World. In June, City Manager Daryl Golbek announced that he was resigning but would continue his longtime duties as public works director. Golbek took over for Tim Rundel, who spent less than two months as city manager before he left in the fall of 2010. He eventually landed a job as assistant city manager at Midwest City. Rundel’s predecessor, Troy Powell, lasted 4 1/2 years before he left for a similar position at The Colony, Texas. Numerous councilors resigned during the Rundel-to-Golbek transition. Perry said Claremore’s city government is much more stable now. The city employs 292 people and has an annual operating budget of about $100 million. It also operates its own water, sewer, sanitation and electric utilities. The city has received at least 20 applications for city manager and will continue taking them through Sept. 14. Ward 4 Councilor Mark Lepak is chairman of the screening committee. No hiring timetable exists, Perry said.

La Palma, California (population 15,568): City officials today announced the selection of Ellen Volmert as the next City Manager of La Palma, contingent on approval by the full City Council at their August 7, 2012, meeting, according to the Hews Media Group. Ms. Volmert will assume her duties on September 4. Ms. Volmert joins La Palma from Corvallis, Oregon where she has been the Assistant City Manager since 1994 and served as City Manager Pro Tem for four months in 2011 following the retirement of the long-time City Manager of that City. She comes to La Palma with broad experience in strategic planning, human resources and labor relations, community relations, capital project management, economic development, budgeting, team facilitation, diversity, technology, organizational development, and risk management. Prior to moving to Corvallis, Ms. Volmert worked for over 14 years in two Southern California Cities, Baldwin Park and West Covina. Ms. Volmert holds a Masters Degree in Public Administration from California State University, Fullerton; a Bachelor Degree in Political Science from University of California, Los Angeles; and is an International City/County Management Association Credentialed Manager. Ms. Volmert’s selection completes a process that began on March 16, 2012, when Dominic Lazzaretto resigned after five years as La Palma’s City Manager. To help assist with the search for a new City Manager, the City retained Bobbi Peckham of the recruiting firm of Peckham and McKenney to undertake a nationwide job search. Of the 64 individuals that applied for the position, 12 were selected as finalists, with 7 being invited to interview with the City Council on June 27 and July 3. Based on those interviews, the top three candidates were identified and invited back for a second interview on July 20.

Covington, Georgia (population 13,118): The Covington City Council held a called meeting Monday evening to discuss how to proceed in the selection process of a new city manager, according to the Newton Citizen. City Manager Steve Horton is retiring, and recently announced that his last day on the job will be Dec. 21. Mayor Ronnie Johnston recommended that the council hire an outside professional firm to recruit and vet applicants, noting that “this is a critical position for the whole city” and recommending the council take a broad perspective, on the state and national level. He also acknowledged that there is also likely interest on the local level and using an outside firm would keep the process “the broadest and cleanest.” Two firms — The Mercer Group Inc. out of Atlanta and Slavin Management Consultants out of Norcross — have already submitted proposals related to the selection process. A third company that was solicited has not yet responded. The council agreed to interview representatives from the companies before making a decision, with a meeting set for 5:30 p.m. Monday, Aug. 13, at City Hall. The meeting is open to the public. Johnston said the cost to hire consultants will likely be between $15,000 and $20,000 and said the entire process will take 90 to 120 days at best. Once candidates are narrowed by the firm, the council will then interview the top candidates, he said, adding that he expects the process “will take many hours of this council’s time.” The city manager oversees the day-to-day operations of the city and all its departments. There is not currently a set salary range for the position, but Horton currently earns an annual salary of $112,798, according to Human Resources Director Ronnie Cowan. Cowan said he believes that is low compared to other city managers doing comparable work, noting that Horton had not accepted salary increases of late. Cowan said he believes whatever consulting firm is hired by the council will likely make recommendations as to a salary and benefits package for the new city manager. The position requires a bachelor’s degree in business administration, accounting, public administration or a related field from an accredited college or university, with a master’s or other graduate degree preferred. Ten years experience in public administration with supervisory experience and a minimum of five years as manager and director of a municipal or county department is also required, along with knowledge of municipal budgeting procedures; record keeping; computers and software; city, county, state and federal laws and ordinances impacting city government; the city’s organizational structure and processes.

Coatesville, Pennsylvania (population 13,100): City Council approved a new manager on Wednesday, according to the Daily Local News. Kirby Hudson, who was the interim city manager and held the assistant manager position before that, was named as the full-time manager on a 5-2 vote. Council also passed a resolution to remove the requirement that the city manager live inside the city. That was also approved on a 5-2 vote. Council President Ed Simpson and Councilwoman Ingrid Jones voted against both measures. About 25 residents attended Wednesday’s meeting and many stood up in support of Hudson being appointed as the new manager. Hudson thanked the public for their outpouring of support. Former Weed and Seed Director Allen Smith announced that he had applied to be manager. Council said it never saw his application. Hudson has worked as assistant manager for six years and has served as interim manager on three separate occasions. Jones said she voted against Hudson, because in order to lift the residency requirement she felt there needed to be a referendum. Simpson said he wanted the residency requirement to remain in place. He also previously stated that he was in favor of a wide search. Hudson said he will focus on the police department as a main priority of his office. Hudson has had some controversy in the city. In 2007, he was arrested for a DUI while serving as assistant manager. There was also some concern over him reportedly not paying taxes on a lump sum he received for work with the Redevelopment Authority. Collins said Wednesday that he has been “exonerated of those charges” concerning the unpaid taxes.

Newmarket, New Hampshire (population 8,936): The Newmarket Town Council is pleased to announce that it has come to an agreement with Steve Fournier of Dover, NH to become the next Town Administrator of Newmarket, according to Foster’s Daily Democrat. The Town Council plans to formally vote to appoint Fournier at its August 15th, 2012 meeting. A native of Somersworth, Fournier holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science from the University of New Hampshire. He is currently the Town Administrator of North Hampton, New Hampshire where he has served since 2007.
Prior to North Hampton, he served as the Town Administrator of Epping and Northwood New Hampshire and as the Director of Administrative Services/Assistant Town Manager of Littleton, NH. Fournier is a member of the Board of Directors of New Hampshire Local Government Center; the current Chair of the New Hampshire Municipal Association’s Municipal Advocacy Committee; a past President of the Municipal Manager’s Association of New Hampshire and active in the International City/County Managers Association. In 2005, Mr. Fournier was named by the Union Leader/NH Business and Industry Association as one of forty New Hampshire’s upcoming leaders under the age of 40. He is involved in many civic activities, and served the City of Somersworth as a City Councilor from 1996 to 2001, two years as its Deputy Mayor.

East Hampton, Connecticut (population 2,691): Michael Maniscalco is the new East Hampton town manager, according to the Reminder News. Born and raised in Trumbull, Conn., Maniscalco looks at the position in East Hampton as something of a homecoming. Maniscalco, 30, attended the University of South Dakota, one of only two universities in the country to offer a degree in American Indian Studies, which was Maniscalco’s passion at the time. He stayed at USD for a graduate degree in public administration. Making his way east, Maniscalco took a position running the National Leadership Grant for the Illinois State Museum. While there, he helped develop a database that takes qualitative data, for example audio and/or video, and makes it quantitative, allowing for broad cross-referencing of various topics. Focused on Illinois agriculture, the database was made available on the Internet. From there, Maniscalco went on to become the senior manager of the Autism Program of Illinois, creating partnerships with other public and private entities across the state to deliver services to kids with disabilities. There, he worked on accessibility projects for kids with autism, and created resource rooms in Chicago for parents and teachers of kids with autism. Immediately before coming to East Hampton, Maniscalco worked as the economic development coordinator for Logan County in Illinois.  There, he was instrumental in preventing the closing of a prison. He also helped develop an aggregation program for electric utilities. A lot of people warned Maniscalco against taking both the Autism Program and the economic development coordinator positions. Maniscalco considered both positions challenges, but nothing that couldn’t be overcome. The recent, well-documented town government controversies don’t dampen Maniscalco’s enthusiasm. n the job for only a few weeks, Maniscalco said he is not making any immediate changes, but is just observing for now. He wants to examine some of the bigger projects, like a town water system and improvements in town facilities that have languished for some time, and decide what can be done to help move them forward.

Iron River, Wisconsin (population 761): Iron River Mayor Terry Tarsi welcomed new City Manager Perry Franzoi to his first regular meeting of the City Council July 18, according to the Iron County Reporter. Franzoi replaces retired City Manager John Archocosky. The former Breitung Township supervisor officially began July 2. Tarsi said Archocosky, who served as city manager for nine years, will stay on as a consultant until Aug. 30, helping Franzoi become acquainted with several ongoing city projects, including water, sewer and the U.S. 2 reconstruction.